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16 results for Our State Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012
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16818
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In the 1940s and 1950s hundreds of baseball players played three days a week in textile leagues around the Piedmont section. Players held jobs in the factories and the mills provided uniforms and equipment and paid time off to play. The games provided residents entertainment and gave them a sense of pride in where they lived. Quality of play varied from community to community, but some of the players were good enough to play professionally with the Washington Senators, Chicago Cubs, and New York Yankees. In the late 1950s as the mills disbanded the villages and television grew in popularity, the teams and leagues folded.
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16819
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In Part II of the executions at Kinston, Gerard recounts the hangings of the twenty-two Confederate deserters and its aftermath.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p54-56, 58, 60-61, il Periodical Website
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16817
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Wrightsville Beach, located in New Hanover County, is featured in OUR STATE's Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p38-40, 42, 44-45, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
17777
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Billy Graham may be a simple farm boy from North Carolina, but he has become one of the most prolific evangelist in American history, preaching in person to more than 215 million people in more than 185 countries and territories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p98-104, 106, 8, 110, 112, f Periodical Website
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17779
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In the 1900s, North Carolina took the massive forests of the state and built a furniture industry unparalleled by any other entity in the United States. Although times and practices have changes, North Carolina still proclaims: \"Ours is better.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p126-130, 132, 134, f Periodical Website
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17778
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As an infant in Watauga County, Arthel Lane Watson lost his sight. As a teenager he picked up a guitar. As an adult he is revered as the great \"Doc\" Watson.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p114-120, 122, 124, f Periodical Website
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17788
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James Latta Built a home on 100 rolling Piedmont acres in 1800 which was expanded over the years. By the 1950s, the plantation sat empty until the locals fought to preserve it. Now restored the Latta Plantation is located within the larger Latta Nature Preserve, where visitors can enjoy costumed actors, period antiques, miles of hiking trails, the equestrian center, and raptor preserve.
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17787
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Most people might not think much about their table salt, but salt from different locations has different textures and flavors. Take, for example, the unique sea salt from the Outer Banks of North Carolina--a special occasion ingredient.
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17785
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North Carolina may have been the state that made stock car racing known, but Richard Petty made it cool. Even at 75, the most winning man in NASCAR is not slowing down.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p136-142, 144-146, 148-149, f Periodical Website
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17786
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Dennis details the rising of the ACC basketball in North Carolina and the superstars that have come out of North Carolina universities.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p150-154, 156, 158, 160, 162-163, f Periodical Website
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38260
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Fans of dancing fads from the late 1930s to early 1970s and from Eastern North Carolina to Tidewater Virginia got their entertainment fill from a venue that became an establishment: Nags Head Casino. Begun as living quarters for stonemasons building the Wright Brothers National Memorial, the site for seminal memories included bowling alleys and was near another site synonymous with Nags Head: Jockey’s Ridge.
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38261
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Scottish customs related to art and athletics, which have been part of western North Carolina’s identity since the 18th century, are recognized in the Grandfather Mountain Highland Games. Discussed is the event established in 1945 and culture of the ethnic group who left in droves due to English rulers restricting many of their customs.
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38259
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Helping to offer an understanding of beach music and shag is the author’s discussion of the dance style, its accompanying music, famous recording artists, and a disc jockey who played a pivotal role in making beach music and shag synonymous with Eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
38262
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Mount Airy vacillates cashing in on a connection to Andy Griffith and the TV series the town inspired. Pride in their native son is displayed in facilities such as the Andy Griffith Museum and Mount Airy Visitors Center. A preference to cleave to the town’s identity is expressed by younger generations who want Mount Airy to be just Mount Airy. Willingness to heighten a connection to the classic comedy is reflected in Mayberry Consignments and Mayberry Days.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p86-88, 90, 92-94, 96 Periodical Website
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38264
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The Asheboro Zoological Park, cited as the largest walk-through, natural-habitat zoo in the world, includes in its experience 30,000 plants and 1,100 animals. From the experience, its rare plant curator hopes visitors become more sensitive to the cause of saving endangered species, mindful of laws related to endangered species, and see all living things as worthy of life.
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