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8 results for Our State Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011
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Record #:
15597
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Abstract:
Spanish mustangs have roamed the dunes around Corolla for five hundred years. As late as 1920, there were 5,000 of them on the northern Outer Banks, but the population had dwindled to 113 by 2010 on the twelve mile strip of sand north of Corolla. As the beach population and summer tourism increases, the horses are pushed into a tighter, smaller habitat. Graff describes the work of Wesley Stallings, who is in his third year as manager of Corolla's famous wild horses.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p106-112, 114-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15599
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Abstract:
Jon Hair is a sculptor on a grand scale. Working in his 7,500-square-foot-studio in Cornelius, just north of Charlotte, he creates monumental sculptures of creatures, mascots, and people. His largest creation to date stands thirty-five feet high. In his eleven years as a sculptor, he has created seventy-nine commissioned pieces. Between 2003 and 2008, he was the official sculptor for the U.S. Olympic Team and the U.S. Olympic Committee.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p174-176, 178, 180, 190, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15596
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Abstract:
Lillian Exum Clement of Asheville could not vote in 1920, yet she became the first woman to win a seat in the North Carolina General Assembly and the first female legislator in the South. The vote was 10,368 to 41. She was also the first women lawyer in the state to open her own law office.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p44-46, 48, 50, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15598
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Abstract:
Graff describes the work of Carl Walker of Manteo, who works to protect the Outer Banks's beauty and natural resources through his work as coordinator of Dare County's Recycling program.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p124-128, 130, 132, 134, 136, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15595
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Spencer, located in Rowan County, is OUR STATE Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p30-34, 36-38, 40, 42, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15675
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Gerard's introduction to his eight-part series on the Civil War, he writes Dr. John D. Bellamy was the epitome of Southern gentry; unfailingly loyal to the Confederacy and profiting from slave labor. Bellamy owned three plantations and approximately 1,000 slaves, the profits from just one plantation paid for his family's mansion in downtown Wilmington. After the outbreak of war, Bellamy sent a contingency of his slaves to construct sand forts along Cape Fear River with no compensation from the Confederate Government. Bellamy and his family later fled Wilmington, the town he helped fortify, after the yellow fever outbreak in 1862 to find refuge at Floral College.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p64-72, 74, 76, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
38294
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Abstract:
The mysteries about the earth’s crust, Dr. Jesse McNinch believed could be solved by studying the landscape beneath the water’s surface. From that determination, a government research project was founded. The United States Army Corp studied natural phenomenon such as coastal erosions patterns and shifting shorelines, emerging in the movement of wind, waves, tides, and currents, through equipment such as CLARIS (Coastal Lidar and Radar Imaging System).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p148-152, 154, 156, 158 Periodical Website
Record #:
38295
Author(s):
Abstract:
The career Marc Basnight devotes himself currently was protecting the shores of Shallowbag Bay and the surrounding land his family had called home for three centuries. Political initiatives spearheaded during his years in the Senate included the passage of a plastic bag ban on the Outer Banks. Environmental initiatives created post-career in Washington making preservation possible included the Natural Heritage Trust Fund and the recycling part of his restaurant’s operation that reduces his carbon footprint.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p160-162, 164, 166 Periodical Website