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12 results for Our State Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009
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11151
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Ann DerGara, an artist and gallery owner, started a unique public art project in Brevard eight years ago. Local artists created sculptures of animals that were common to that area of the state and placed them around the downtown area. Today, there are fifteen animals, including a red wolf, elk, fox, and bear, scattered around a ten-block area.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p54-56, 58, 60, il Periodical Website
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11150
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Garner writes about favorite Southern foods, in this instance - biscuits. He discusses the origin of Biscuitville, founded by Maurice Jennings, in Danville, Virginia, in 1975. The headquarters later moved to North Carolina. Today there are fifty-one Biscuitvilles located in North Carolina and Virginia, and the company is still family-owned.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p48-50, 52-53, il Periodical Website
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11148
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Lexington, county seat of Davidson County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The city, known as the \"Barbecue Capital of the World,\" attracts over 100,000 people yearly to its Barbecue Festival. Other places to visit include the Bob Timberlake Gallery, the Childress Vineyards, and The Candy Factory.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p24-26, 28, 30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11149
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Thomasville native Stuart Warren Cramer - architect, author, and inventor - transformed the textile industry and turned the industry in a new direction with his innovations. Her perfected the layout of textile mills, developed an air-conditioning system, and created a first-class mill village.
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11160
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Started in 1972, the Nantahala Outdoor Center near Bryson City is a nationally known center for beginners and experts who enjoy white-water canoeing, rafting, kayaking, and other outdoor activities. By the end of the first year, 800 people had gone down the Nantahala River, and by 2008, that many go down the river in a single day. The center provides thrilling excursions on four state rivers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p134-136, 138, 140, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11163
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Price's Chicken Coop, located in Charlotte, is owned by Drew and Stephen Price and has sold great meals at a fair price since the 1960s. It is not a fancy place--red-brick exterior, white-painted concrete block walls on the interior, and no place to sit. Armed with a secret marinade, a helping of Southern charm, and twenty or so knowledgeable employees, the restaurant sends happy customers away Tuesday through Saturday.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p167-168, 170-171, il, por Periodical Website
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11157
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The Enterprise Waters Program, started by the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians as a way to bring fishermen to the waters around Cherokee, is forty years old. The program consists of thirty miles of well-stocked trout streams and three trout ponds. Tons of trout are raised each year in the tribal hatchery, including over 360,000 rainbow trout and hundreds of other species.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p108-110, 112-113, il Periodical Website
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11159
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For canoe enthusiasts, eastern North Carolina provides 1,200 miles of navigable waters. Two proponents of this activity are Paul Ferguson, who has explored the state's waterways for thirty-five years and is the author of the guidebook, PADDLING EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA, and Tom Potter, Executive Director of the nonprofit North Carolina Paddle Trails Association.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p124-126, 128-129, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11158
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Gray Granite Quarry, now called Fantasy Lake, lies ten miles from Raleigh. Stone was quarried there from the 1920s till 1950, when a natural spring filled up the 52-acre quarry. Cinquemani discusses how the abandoned property was transformed into a place for scuba divers in the 1980s.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p114-118, 120, 122, il Periodical Website
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11155
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The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is celebrating its 75th anniversary. Boykin recounts how a combination of politicians, businessmen, tourism boosters, local residents, and nature lovers brought the part into existence.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p86-90, 92, 94, 96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11156
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Pittard describes parks in three of North Carolina's largest cities where residents can find a quiet space amid the hubbub of city life. They are Pullen Park (Raleigh), Freedom Park (Charlotte), and Center City Park (Greensboro).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p98-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11161
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Westbrook describes a weekend in the North Carolina Sandhills, a section of the state known for great dining, shopping, accommodation, and golf.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p148-153, il Periodical Website
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