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16 results for Our State Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007
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Record #:
9440
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In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk on Densons Creek Trail. The 2.3-mile trail, which is located in the Uwharrie National Forest, was built in 1974 by the Youth Conservation Corps.
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Record #:
9442
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Wilson, county seat of Wilson County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month. The town incorporated in 1849. For years its economy depended on tobacco, but that product has now declined. Gigley discusses the town's emergence as an entertainment-and-arts hub.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p20-22, 24-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
9441
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Hance describes three inns that have passed down through family generations to their current owners. They are The Roanoke Island Inn (Manteo); The Blair House Bed and Breakfast (Troy); and the Hemlock Inn (Bryson City).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p210-212, 214, 216, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9447
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In 1901, Eleanor Vance and Charlotte Yale came to Asheville as missionaries after earlier graduating from the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago with the purpose of helping people in the mountain communities. They went on to teach valuable weaving and wood carving skills to many of the residents and eventually founded Biltmore Estate Industries, one of the country's most famous crafts enterprises. While weaving was done at Biltmore, hand-carved wooden toys were made by the Tryon Toy-Makers and Wood-Carvers Shop in Tryon. The most famous creation from this shop was Morris the Horse, which became a town trademark.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p114-116, 118, 120, 122, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9449
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Stuart Nye, the originator of the jewelry that bears his name, began his business on a whim. Returning from World War I, Nye was recuperating at the Veterans Hospital near Asheville. Casting about for an occupation, he began tinkering with jewelry making, and in 1933, became a full time jewelry maker. Most of his designs come from nature and include dogwoods, lilies, pansies, and pine cones. After World War II, he struck up a partnership with Ralph Morris, Sr., and when Nye retired in 1948, Morris continued the business, retaining the well-established name. The business continues this day under the direction of Ralph Morris, Jr.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p138-140, 142, 144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9444
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Disease, overharvesting, pollution, poor water quality, and habitat destruction have caused the Eastern oyster to decline over 90 percent in the state during the last century. Concern for the oyster's future has brought together state agencies like the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries and other state conservation groups to chart a course of action. There is now a statewide plan to save North Carolina's oysters by building hatcheries and recycling oyster shells.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p42-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9446
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Coffey discusses the creations of Watauga County natives Daniel Winkler and Karen Shook. Winkler crafts knives, and Shook makes the sheaths that hold them. They have been practicing their crafts full time for almost twenty years in the Boone and Blowing Rock area. Both are self-taught. Their creations are historically influenced and focus on the period of the 1700s. Through a museum artifact Shook discovered that rawhide is a more appropriate and durable material for knives than leather, and her sheaths complement Winkler's blade designs.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p102-104, 106, 108, 110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9445
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Virginia Boone of Canton is ninety-four years old and braided the first of her colorful, long-lasting rugs in 1945. Her rugs are known for their longevity and extra thickness. Choosing colors and coordinating them is one of her skills. Her rugs have found a place in all fifty states and in seven foreign countries. Since 1950, her rugs have been featured at the North Carolina State Fair's Village of Yesteryear.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p92-93, 96, 98, 100, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9443
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In 1754, Hugh Waddell left a life of destitution in Ireland and came to North Carolina to seek his fortune. He would become the highest ranking military leader in the province. In October 2007, a monument commemorating his accomplishments will be dedicated at the Fort Dobbs State Historic Site in Statesville.
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Record #:
9448
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Richards discusses the work of wood turning artisans Steve Noggle and Alan Hollar.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p124-126, 128, 130, 132, 134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9477
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Ramona Lossie is a sixth-generation Cherokee basket weaver, and her daughters are seventh-generation weavers. She learned the art of weaving from her mother and grandmother. Creating a basket can take as long as four months; this includes collecting the material and preparing it. Her baskets sell for up to $2,000, depending on the size and complexity, and increase in value through the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p146-148, 150,, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9478
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Hance discusses the development of the dulcimer in the mountains of North Carolina and the craftsmen who make them today.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p172-174, 176, 178, 180, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9479
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The Quilt Trail Project, which began in Tennessee, has crossed the border into six North Carolina mountain counties. The project honors the long standing tradition of quilting. Grant money and private donations finance the design, construction, and installation of these decorative, highly colorful signs that depict classic and original quilt patterns. The designs are displayed on the sides of barns and other buildings.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p182-184, 186, 188, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9480
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In 1949, before he became a world-famous poet, A. R. Ammons held his first teaching job at Hatteras Elementary School in Hatteras Village on the Outer Banks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p204-206, 208, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9481
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For thirty years, Salisbury weaver Whitney Johnson Peckmen wove tapestries. Now she has moved into a medium using unique materials; she paints on gourds. Peckman uses tall, shapely Zucca gourds which she buys from a grower in California.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p220-222, 224, 226, il Periodical Website
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