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9 results for Our State Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007
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Record #:
8930
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In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk in the cool, refreshing air and lush evergreens of Roan Mountain's Cloudland Trail. The walk is 2.4 miles round-trip over a surface of pine needles, asphalt, stone slabs, and some roots, and it is some of the easier and most pleasant mountain walking in North Carolina.
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8941
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North Carolina ranks second in the total number of reported fatalities and fourth in reported injuries from lightning strikes. Between 1959 and 2004, lightning killed 182 people in the state and injured an additional 550 who survived. The high incidence of strikes is directly related to the large number of North Carolinians who engage in outdoor activities, either for work or pleasure. In 1907, fifty Cape Fear Power Company construction workers in Chatham County took refuge in a building as a storm approached; lightning struck the structure, killing seven and injuring the rest. This record stood until 1961, when lightning struck a Sampson County tobacco barn, killing eight and injuring four. The record of eight deaths from a single lightning bolt remains unsurpassed in the nation.
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Record #:
8942
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The Historical Cooking Guild of the Catawba Valley base of operations is the James K. Polk Memorial near Pineville, and they demonstrate cooking techniques and foods of the 18th- and 19th-centuries. One of the group's main goals is having the food taste like it would have over 200 years ago. To add authenticity to their demonstrations, Cooking Guild members dress in period costumes. They also train interpreters at other historic sites. When doing a demonstration, guild members use only those fruits and vegetables that would have been in season and available to colonial cooks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p92-94, 96, 98-100, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8938
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Burnsville, county seat of Yancey County, is Our State magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town was named for Otway Burns, a privateer during the War of 1812. Mining mica and gems, flax cultivation, wild ginseng collecting, and logging supported Burnsville during the 19th-century, but retail and tourism industries propel the town's economy today. Tourist attractions include the McElroy House, NuWray Inn, DK Puttyroot and The Orchid Tearoom, and Lil Smoky's Drive-in & Restaurant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8940
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At age 102, Wayland Baum is thought to be the oldest living former employee of the U.S. Lighthouse Service. His father, Thomas Hardy Baum, was an assistant lighthouse keeper at stations on the Outer Banks. Wayland was born August 16, 1904. Baum recounts his days as a substitute lighthouse keeper and time spent on a boat that delivered supplies to the lighthouses. He later had a career in commercial and charter boat fishing and guiding waterfowl hunters. Baum retired at 85 and maintains his own home, washing the windows and painting the house when it needs it.
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Record #:
8943
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Begun in 1967 and once housed in a small brick building, the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City has room to grow in its newly opened 50,000-square-foot facility. The four-story building draws upon the historic Outer Banks United States Life Saving Service buildings for its design. The museum portrays the customs and values of the people who settled and sustained the Albemarle region. Two historic buildings that were moved to the museum and restored on-site are the Jackson House (1755) and an 1840s smokehouse.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p160-162, 164-165, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8939
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On April 6, 1917, the United States entered World War I. The war affected life on the home front in North Carolina through conservation of food and gasoline, recycling, women stepping into civilian jobs vacated by men in service, and the planting of over 50,000 victory gardens.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p25-26, 28, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9003
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Up to the age of 50, Earline heath King had been a color tinter of photographs, a singer for conventioneers, and a homemaker supporting her husband's career as a painter. King always signed her maiden name in the lower case. Her husband Joe was a well-known painter, and one of his commissions was to paint a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. At age 50, she reluctantly took a course in sculpting, and a new career was born. Her sculptures have been shown in England, Italy, and across the country. Twenty-two pieces of public art, including statues of Bowman Gray and Winston Churchill, are on display in her native Winston-Salem. At age 93, she has seven commissions awaiting her attention.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p174-176, 178, 180, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9004
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Visitors will find a number of things to explore in the historic Quaker town of Jamestown in Guilford County. The sights include public library, which is housed in a restored 1915 schoolhouse; the Quaker meetinghouse at High Point City Lake Park; River Twist, a gift-and-garden show; Mendenhall Plantation; and the Jamestown General Store.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p184-186, 188-189, il Periodical Website
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