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16 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006
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Record #:
7627
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OUR STATE magazine begins a bimonthly feature on classic Southern flavors. In this first of a series of articles, Garner discusses one of the South's most famous dishes--fried chicken. North Carolina Representative Edith Warren of Farmville and famous restaurateur and cookbook author Mildred Council of Chapel Hill comment on their approach to cooking chicken. Garner describes several eating establishments where the best fried chicken can be found, including Strickland Dail Dining and Catering (Snow Hill); The Whole Truth Grocery and Lunchroom (Wilson); Ye Old Country Kitchen (Snow Camp); and Price's Chicken Coop (Charlotte).
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7628
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Jan Karon brought to life the imaginary mountain town of Mitford in nine novels. The town is based on Blowing Rock, where Karon lived while she wrote most of the books. The story lines follow the central character, Father Tim Kavanagh, an Episcopalian priest who ministers to his mountain parish. Martin describes Karon's struggles to write the first book and how it found a place with a New York publisher. Although the Mitford series is complete, Karon will continue the Father Tim character through three more novels in new locales.
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7623
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For three generations members of the Gillespie family were prolific crafters of handmade rifles, first in Transylvania County, and then for two more generations in Henderson County. The rifles were known in western North Carolina for their reliability and workmanship. Because no two rifles were alike, each one had to have bullets made specifically for it. The family's rifle-making tradition came to an end in 1891, when John Harvey Gillespie, the last of the gun makers, died.
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7626
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John and Terry Graedon of Chapel Hill are a health conscious couple. Their popular People's Pharmacy series of books, a thrice-weekly syndicated newspaper column, and a weekly radio call-in program on National Public Radio reach millions of people each week. Joe Graedon has a master's degree in pharmacology, and Terry has a Ph.D. in medical anthropology. On the radio and in their books and columns the Graedons deal with questions about common health concerns.
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Record #:
7625
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Albemarle, the county seat of Stanly County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The residents of the town take pride in preserving the town's historic buildings, such as transforming the crumbling, turn-of-the-century drugstore into the Boardroom Bar and Bistro. Prunkl takes the reader on a tour of the town, including the Pee Dee Avenue Historic District, Albemarle Music Store, Whispering Pines BBQ, and the Badin Road Drive-in Theatre.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7624
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Jackson surveys bed-and-breakfast inns that are just right for a romantic getaway. They are A Bed of Roses (Asheville); Harmony House Inn (New Bern); and the Forever Inn (Wadesboro).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p116-118, 120, 122, 124, il Periodical Website
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7631
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Wilmington-based Cape Fear Riverwood recovers from the bottom of the Cape Fear River centuries-old logs that were floated downriver by loggers from the late 1700s to early 1900s. Many of the logs that sank along the route are rare old-growth cypress and heart pine between three and seven hundred years old. Once cut, the wood is used in flooring, furniture, and house building. The wood is popular because of its hue, incredibly tight grain, age, and rarity. Since the company was found in the 1990s, around 25,000 logs have been reclaimed. The company estimates that around one million logs still lie on the river bottom, so there is no danger of ever running out of material.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p96-98, 100-101, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7633
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The North Carolina Award is the highest civilian honor bestowed on citizens of the state. On November 21, 2005, the following six individuals received the award for lifetime achievements in public service, literature, fine arts, and science: Joseph M. Bryan (Philanthropist); Betty Debnam Hunt (Author); Randall Kenan (Author); Thomas Willis Lambeth (Education and Civil Rights); Bland Simpson (Author); and Dr. Mansukh C. Wani (Medical Research).
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Record #:
7634
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In 1993, fossil hunter Mike Hammer excavated the remains of a Thescelosaurus in South Dakota. The dinosaur was named Willo after the wife of the property owner. The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences purchased the skeleton in 1996 and brought it to Raleigh. Willo is displayed in its original posture, still embedded in the sandstone in which it rested for millions of years. What makes this dinosaur unique is that the specimen contains a fossilized heart.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p112-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7635
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In the country's fast-paced society, Raeford's Barbershop is unique. It is a shop where people can come in and stay as long as they want and where what's on a person's mind is more important than what's on one's head. It is a place where the community comes together without regard for one another's bank account, skin color, hair texture, religion, or age. Molinary describes the shop and its owner James Raeford.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p128-130, 132, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7629
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Witherspoon Rose Culture in Durham specializes in installing and maintaining rose gardens across North Carolina. The business was founded in 1951 by R. K. Witherspoon, starting with one truck and forty plants. Today, the company tends 2,200 gardens in the state, containing approximately 70,000 plants. The company ships around 200 selected varieties of roses nationwide and sells potted roses at the garden shop in Durham.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p68-70, 72, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7630
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Lee undertakes a search of North Carolina to find the best chocolate creations. She lists places where most historical chocolates, the finest fudge and brownies, fried-and-true truffles, the most fun Tar Heel chocolates, the best hot chocolate, and the best chocolate pie, cake, bread pudding, milk, and pecan candy can be found.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p80-84, 86, 88-89, il Periodical Website
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7632
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Jackson describes three plants that are indigenous to North Carolina -- the bleeding heart, hearts a'bustin,' and forget-me-not.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p104-106, 108, 110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7642
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Alleghany County is OUR STATE magazine's featured county of the month. The county is somewhat distinct among the mountain counties because the landscape is more like a plateau combined with mountain ranges and high summits. The county is among the state's smallest, but it ranks third in the production of Christmas trees. The Blue Ridge Parkway and the New River and its tributaries attract tourists. Loss of some manufacturing facilities has slowed the economy, but the county is still home to manufacturers who produce a variety of products, including paper products, game boards, packaging materials, wrought iron furniture, and structural products, like truck trailers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p152-154, 155, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7641
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The Virginia Creeper was a short-line train that ran seventy-five miles from Abington, Virginia to Elkland, now known as Todd. It was in operation from 1900 to 1977. The train was nicknamed the Creeper because mountain terrain limited its maximum speed to twenty-five miles an hour. Ashe County artist Stephen Shoemaker has fond memories of the train as it passed through his hometown of West Jefferson. He is currently painting a series of eight pictures based on the train. Shoemaker discusses his work and other paintings and what drew him to the series of train paintings.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p146-148, 150, il Periodical Website
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