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19 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005
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Record #:
7380
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The story of the mysterious hoof prints near Bath in Beaufort County has been told for over 200 years. Sometime between 1802 and 1812, depending on the version of the story, Jesse Elliott, a profane, hard-drinking man, challenged someone to a horserace. The race took place on Sunday, and it was sinful to race on the Sabbath day. During the race, Elliott's horse, Fury, dug his hoofs into the soil and reared, throwing Elliott against a tree and killing him. The hoof prints remain to this day. Anything placed in them - sticks, stones, dirt, even sticks pushed deep into the ground - will be gone the next day.
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Record #:
7381
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Tired of having to meet in a variety of locations Sunday after Sunday, the Methodist community in the Hyde County town of Swan Quarter decided to build a church. Unfortunately, the owner of the town lot they wanted would not sell it. Finally in 1874, land was purchased outside the town. On September 16, 1876, the newly-built church was dedicated. Unbeknownst to the parishioners, a hurricane was approaching, and it struck the night of the dedication. Zepke describes the events of that night in which the church was set afloat and finally came to rest on the piece of property the parishioners originally wanted.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7379
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Kathryn Stripling Byer is the new poet laureate for the state of North Carolina. She is the state's fifth poet laureate and the first women to hold the position since its creation seventy years ago. A native of Georgia, she came to North Carolina at the age of twenty-one to study creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Byer has received a number of awards for her poetry including the Lamont Prize in 1992 for the best second book by an American poet and the Southeast Booksellers Association Best Book of the Year in Poetry Award in 2003.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p46-48, 50, 52-53, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7392
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Not yet thirty years of age, Joshua P. Warren of Asheville is an internationally known expert on things paranormal. He has authored eight books, written newspaper articles, and explored almost one thousand paranormal locations. He has seen an apparition only once. He is the founder and president of the League of Energy Materialization and Unexplained phenomena Research (L.E.M.U.R.). This team of researchers conducts investigations using high-tech devices, including electromagnetic field detection, infrared and ultraviolet photography, sub-sonic audio recording, and three-dimensional photography.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p148-150, 152, 154, 156, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7388
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Cancetto Farmica was a young Italian carnival worker who was killed in a fight just across the state line in South Carolina in 1911. The nearest place to have a body embalmed was in Laurinburg, North Carolina, at the McDougald Funeral Home. Founded in 1881, the home is today the oldest operating family-owned funeral service in the state. Farmica's father paid for the embalming and said he would sent money for the funeral. The money never came. The funeral home retained the body in a glass case. The business moved four times over a sixty-year period, and each time took the body, now known as the Laurinburg Mummy, with it. Hodge recounts events from these sixty years and the final disposition of the body.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p118-120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7391
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On January 30, 1932, in the town of Bladenboro, at the Elm Street home of Council H. Williamson and his wife Lydia, a series of fires occurred in five different rooms of the house. A window shade and a curtain would burn. After this fire was put out, another window shade would catch fire. The most serious happening was when a young girl's dress suddenly ignited. She escaped injury. Later a pair of trousers hanging in a closet took fire. There were twenty fires in all, the last occurring on February 1, 1932. Tomlin discusses the theories that surrounded the fires, from the scientific to the paranormal.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p140-142, 144-145, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7386
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A twelve-mile tract of land in the western part of the state, often called the \"Orphan Strip,\" was claimed in the early 1800s by North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Georgia called it Walton County. South Carolina said their settlers were there in 1786. North Carolina said their state was formed before Georgia. Jackson traces the claims and counter-claims among the states. The issue was finally settled at MaGaha Branch in January 1811, in what is called the Walton War. After 200 North Carolina militiamen fought an unorganized band of Georgians, the property became the sole possession of North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p98-100, 102-103, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7390
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Pittard reports on unexplained happenings in North Carolina's 165-year-old Capitol building in Raleigh. Workers up on scaffolds in the building have been tapped on the shoulder. Ghostly voices have been captured on tape at 20,000 hertz, well above the normal hearing range of human beings. Visitors feel cold spots. Photographers using infrared film capture images and shapes unseen by the naked eye. Investigators continue to study and analyze the reported occurrences, but to date, the building continues to keep it secrets.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p132-134, 136, 138, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7387
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Fourteen months before the Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia, a group of leaders in Mecklenburg County met on May 20, 1775, to sign the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence. Was this the first document declaring freedom for the American colonies, or was it just a fanciful story? Mecklenburg has celebrated and commemorated the document for 180, but the controversy over its origination challenges its legitimacy. Timblin examines this dispute over legitimacy, beginning in 1819 down to the present-day.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p104-106, 108,110-111, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7393
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In the town of Brevard, located in Transylvania County, the whole community participates in the Halloween spirit. Orange and black colors decorate the downtown areas. Merchants put up elaborate window decorations. Cornstalks, pumpkins, and scarecrows appear all over the town, and citizens put ghostly displays in their yards. For the past quarter of a century, October has culminated in a community celebration called the Halloweenfest.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p158-160, 162, 164, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7389
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An encounter with a UFO on the campus of Lynchburg College in 1951 led Mt. Airy native George Fawcett to a lifetime study of this strange phenomenon. Fawcett, who now lives in Lincolnton, has lectured extensively, written hundreds of articles on UFO sightings, authored a book, and investigated over 3,000 alleged UFO incidents.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p124-126, 128-129, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7397
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On his two hundred acres of land near Hickory, Robert Hart has the largest collection of historically restored cabins in the nation. There are seventy structures that date from 1782 to 1873 in the reconstructed village. Each building is furnished according to its use. Hart has collected the cabins from all over the state. For the past twenty years, the Harts have opened their village for one day in October. Around 200 volunteer artisans demonstrate period techniques of flax breaking and hacking, herb dyeing, shingle riving, and others, to the more than 3,000 visitors.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p198-199 , 200-201, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7394
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Chicken Bridge, near Pittsboro in Chatham County, had a long-standing tradition of lighting pumpkins on Halloween. In 1987, a local newspaper reported that around 500 people had come to the wooden bridge to enjoy the lit pumpkins. Within a few years, the state demolished the bridge and built a new two-lane concrete one. The increased traffic made it too dangerous to continue the pumpkin-lighting tradition. Not willing to give up their Halloween tradition, the citizens moved down to an old bridge near Bynum that the state was planning to demolish. People in Chatham County prevailed on the state to save the bridge on condition that no cars would ever use it again. Martin describes a typical pumpkin lighting.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p166-168, 170, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7398
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People who craft ships inside bottles do not always receive a great deal of attention in the highbrow art world. Some, like Jim Goodwin of Charlotte, have achieved true folk art status with their creations of intricate and historically accurate ships. Goodwin focuses mainly on building ships that have a connection to the Carolinas. Many of replicas are of ships that were built in the state, captained by local pirates, or were wrecked along the state's treacherous shores. Goodwin, a history buff, teaches geology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p202-205, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7400
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Anson County was formed from Bladen County in 1750 and named for Lord George Anson, a British admiral. Wadesboro is the county seat. The county is home to an active historical society. A number of historic homes as well as 500 cemeteries are found throughout the area. The Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge attracts 35,000 visitors annually, and educational and historical groups study around 150 prehistoric and historic sites, many along the Pee Dee River. A number of famous people were born in Anson County, including Leonidas Polk, state agricultural leader; John Kiker, NASA scientist; and Samuel Spencer, N.C. Supreme Court Justice.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p210-212, 214, 216, 218-219, il Periodical Website
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