NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6883
Author(s):
Abstract:
Morris visited seven of North Carolina's tiniest towns. He describes each one and discusses why these small places appeal to people. Each of the towns is listed in the U.S. census of 2000 as an incorporated municipality with a population under 300. The towns are Gatesville (pop. 281); Seven Springs (pop. 86); Macon (pop. 115); Seagrove (pop. 274); Danbury (pop. 108); Hayesville (pop. 297); and Seven Devils (pop. 130).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p92-98, 100-102, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6896
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cruze discusses the Endor iron furnace which was built near Sanford in Lee County in 1862. The furnace went into blast in 1863, producing twenty-one tons of pig iron a day for material used in Confederate munitions. No one can say for certain who the builder was or how the furnace got its name. The stones used in the construction weighed between one and two thousand pounds and were joined without using mortar. Today the top left corner of the furnace remains in its original condition, standing thirty-five feet tall and thirty-two feet wide with an eight foot tall open arch on each side. The furnace was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1974.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p27-28, 30-31, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6895
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jacksonville, county seat of Onslow County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The city dates back to the 1700s and is the state's eleventh largest city with over 66,000 residents. The Marine Corps arrived in 1941 and its presence remains today with Camp Lejeune, the largest Marine Corps amphibious training center in the country. Besides military history and tributes located in Jacksonville, visitors can visit the Lynnwood Park Zoo, the Coastal Plains Raceway Park, the Jacksonville Raiders semi-pro football team, and a variety of restaurants and shopping venues.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p18-20, 22-24, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6897
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mast General Store was opened for business in Valle Crucis in 1883 by Henry Taylor. In 1897, he sold a half interest in the store to W. W. Mast. The Mast family operated it until 1973, when they sold it to an absentee landlord. The store closed in 1977. Enter John and Faye Cooper, who were attracted to the site in 1976. Boyanoski describes how the Coopers purchased and revived the store, establishing it as an institution, treasured by locals and visitors for its mix of the old and the new.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
6927
Abstract:
Oesterreich discusses how the town of Manteo's waterfront underwent a change from the 1970s, when it was an industrial docking location with massive aboveground fuel storage tanks, to today's picturesque harbor of waterfront condos, shops, restaurants, the Roanoke Island Festival Park, bike paths, and boardwalks. The creation of the 20-year plan for change involved citizens, professors and students from the North Carolina State University School of Design, and state and local officials. Almost every goal in the plan was met. The Manteo Way of Building is one of the most studied town planning models in the nation.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p106-108, 110, 112, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6928
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Macedonia neighborhood in High Point was a long-time example of urban blight, filled with crumbling houses and garbage-strewn lots. Then High Point, eager for a change in one of its worst areas, the Center for the Study of Social Issues at UNC-Greensboro, wanting students to explore making a difference in the real world, and the Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church, seeking to extend its mission to its own community, came together to rescue and rejuvenate the neighborhood. Caldwell discusses the process of and results from this collaboration.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p144-148, 150, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6925
Abstract:
Asheville is known for its downtown art galleries and craft shops. Along the French Broad River is the city's industrial riverfront containing rows of warehouses. Here, over the past decade, artists have been converting the old buildings into studios. The area is known as the River Arts District. Currently there is a thriving community of over forty-five artists and artisans working there, including potters, quilters, and painters.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p38-40, 42-43, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6929
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1891, Madison County had seventy-nine schools to educate the county's six thousand schoolchildren. Between 1920 and 1940, many of these schools were consolidated into five. These five had walls constructed of rock. By the 1980s, all five had closed except one. Now the citizens of these five school communities are working together to renovate and restore the buildings as community centers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p154-156, 158, 160, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6926
Author(s):
Abstract:
Built in 1868, the Page-Walker Hotel in Cary was a resting place for railroad travelers. Today it is on the National Register of Historic Places and known as the Page-Walker Arts and History Center. Paige recounts the building's history and current use for family gatherings, lectures, Friday evening concerts, art exhibitions, and weddings.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 6, Nov 2004, p53-54, 56-57, il Periodical Website
Full Text: