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14 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004
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Record #:
6750
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Washington, county seat of Beaufort County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month. Colonel James Bonner named the Pamlico River settlement for George Washington in 1776. Oesterreich describes this town which is committed to preserving its past while investing heavily in the future. The city has recently transformed its waterfront area, building new boat docks and reconfiguring traffic patterns. Moss Landing, on the site of the old Moss Planing Mill, is a planned $30 million residential and commercial development.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
6751
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“Outdoor wall murals can create beauty and interest on any otherwise large, blank surface,” says Jeffrey York, director of public art and community design at the North Carolina Arts Council in Raleigh. “The subject matter of a mural can also tell something about the history of the identity of the community.” Kunkel discusses outdoor murals in Valdese, King's Mountain, West Jefferson, Siler City, Chapel Hill, Wilmington, and Thomasville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p30-32, 34, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6752
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A top North Carolina historian, public school educator, and storyteller, Rodney Kemp is an institution in Morehead City. He has averaged 100 to 150 story presentations a year since 1990. His long years of work with The History Place in Morehead City led to the establishment of a Rodney B. Kemp gallery in his honor. For his passion for preserving the past, Kemp was named Historian of the Year for 2003 by the North Carolina Society of Historians.
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6753
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“The summer flowering episode is my favorite, particularly in the mountain region,” says Adams. ”Beginning around mid-July and lasting into September, the roadsides become an exciting hodgepodge of vivid yellows, purples, and reds.” The flowers that Adams describes are summer wildflowers. Spring wildflowers have plenty of sunshine to grow in, but the summer ones must compete for the light. This makes them grow tall, big, and in thick clusters. Such growth makes for good viewing of their blossoms either on road shoulders or in adjoining fields. He describes wildflower viewing in the following areas: Blue Ridge Parkway, Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Ashe and Alleghany Counties, U.S. Highway 19, and Nantahala and Pisgah national forests.
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Record #:
6759
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“Banana pudding is the most widely served dessert in North Carolina's barbecue's restaurants,” writes Bob Garner, North Carolina's barbecue guru. But as to how this dessert made with tropical fruit became such a favorite in the Old North State is anybody's guess. Garner says, “Probably because it's relatively quick and easy to make, and because the creamy taste and soft texture provide a pleasant contrast to the tangy bite of the barbecue and/or coleslaw.” Gigley lists five restaurants and describes their particular styles of banana pudding. They are Jed's Bar-B-Cue, Greensboro; Gary's Barbecue, China Grove; The Gathering Place, Archdale; Taste of Country Buffet, Wilmington; and Tupelo Honey Café, Asheville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p118-121, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6758
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After selling their cucumbers to the big produce markets, farmers in Wayne and Duplin Counties were always left with a number of small, crooked ones that wouldn't sell. In the early 1920s, Lebanese immigrant Shickrey Baddour hit upon the idea to soak them in brine and make pickles. By 1925, his company was packing 6,000 cases of pickles a year. That was the start of the Mt. Olive Pickle Company, which today is the largest independent pickle company in the country. Mt. Olive pickles are number one in the Southeast and the second best-selling pickle in the United States.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p110-112, 114, 116-117, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6757
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Potatoes are a profitable crop in North Carolina's coastal counties because the soil there is fertile and potato-friendly. Currently around 17,500 acres are under cultivation. The potato crop generates between $15 million to $17 million into the local economies of Beaufort, Camden, Carteret, Currituck, Hyde, Pamlico, Pasquotank, Tyrrell, and Washington Counties. During a five-week harvest season, Pat McCotter, of Vandemere, will ship between fifteen to twenty tractor-trailer loads a day.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p106-109, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6756
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Fine furniture is made there. A famous artist, Bob Timberlake, lives and creates there. However, it is barbecue that carries Lexington's name across the country and around the world. Currently there are twenty-one barbecue restaurants, some in their third generation of owners, in the town of 20,000. Caldwell discusses barbecue, the restaurants, and the yearly Lexington Barbecue Festival which TRAVEL AND LEISURE magazine called “one of the top 10 food festivals in the USA.”
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p94-96, 98, 100-102, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6754
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Eighty-seven years ago, Cheerwine, a burgundy-colored cola with a hint of lemon-lime, was first bottled in Salisbury, in Rowan County. As the company approaches its centennial in 2017, it still remains family-owned. The company markets in eleven other states, but makes most of its revenues in North Carolina. The company has developed a respectable mail-order business for North Carolinians who have moved away. Prunkl discusses the history of the company.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p78-80, 82, 84-85, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6760
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The old Weldon Daeke store, located in Ridgeway in Warren County, has come back to life as the Ridgeway Opry House. It is also home to the Germantown Strings, a dulcimer band. Pittard discusses each musician in the six-member band and the style of music they perform, which includes old-time gospel, country, bluegrass, and mountain music.
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Record #:
6755
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North Carolina is home to a number of sauce companies and of one of the most famous sauces of all time, Texas Pete Hot Sauce. Seldon discusses four sauce companies-–T. W. Garner Food Company (Winston-Salem); Thomas Gourmet Foods (Greensboro); Carolina Treet, Inc. (Wilmington); and Cackalacky, Inc. (Chapel Hill).
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Record #:
6761
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Grizzle describes three luxury bed and breakfast establishments found in North Carolina's three geographic areas. These three grand inns are the Swag Country Inn in Waynesville (mountains); J. H. Adams Inn in High Point (Piedmont); and the Verandas in Wilmington (coastal).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p132-134, 136, 138-139, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6762
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Lee discusses El's Drive-In, a tiny mom-and-pop restaurant and an institution in Morehead City since 1954. The restaurant is small, being a mere 20-by-40 feet, and there are no talk-boxes to call in your order. Waitresses come out to the car just as they have done for fifty years. The business was founded by Elvin and Helen Franks and has made its mark on the city with its extra-thick superburgers and the famous shrimpburger.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p146-147, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6858
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The John C. Campbell Folk School in Cherokee County's Brasstown, attracts yearly some 3,000 people, who study subjects from blacksmithing to writing. The school opened in 1925. The term folk school comes from the Danish language and means “a school for the people.” Thus, while folk traditions like pottery, weaving, and carving are studied there, people are also free to pursue non-folk interests, such as photography and genealogy, that help them to grow as creative people.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p96-98, 100-101, il Periodical Website
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