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16 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004
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6695
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Outsider artist Clyde Jones was born near Goldsboro in the late 1940s and now lives in Bynum. Carving with a chainsaw, the self-taught artist creates sculptures out of felled trees, preferably heavy Georgia cedar. His works of art are incredibly difficult to move because of their weight. Over the last ten years Jones has added two-dimensional painting to his repertoire. Most of his paintings show bold, thickly rendered animals, such as penguins, giraffes, cows, and fish.
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6694
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Scott Blackwell founded the Immaculate Baking Company, which makes gourmet cookies, in 1995. Blackwell also travels the back roads of the South to find the art of obscure, often elderly folk artists. He promotes this folk art by putting it on packages of his cookies. On the sides of the packages he includes photographs and profiles of the artists. Currently Blackwell is engaged in building the Folk Artist's Museum next to the cookie plant. The museum is scheduled to open in 2006.
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6691
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Waynesville, county seat of Haywood County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. It is the largest town in the county and was named for Revolutionary War General “Mad Anthony” Wayne. There is no shortage of things to do and see there. The town offers a diverse arts and culture scene. The downtown area is quaint, charming, and reminiscent of bygone days. Its eclectic mix of retailers and places to visit include the Mast General Store and the Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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6696
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The Robersonville Primitive Baptist Church, built in 1910, closed its doors seventy years later. In the 1990s, Everette James, a retired physician and medical school professor, purchased and restored it. The former place of worship now houses St. James Place Museum. Visitors can view a collection of Southern folk art, 400 pieces of North Carolina pottery, quilts from every county, and a sizeable collection of African American quilts.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p78-82, il, por Periodical Website
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6693
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Music Maker Relief Foundation is celebrating its tenth anniversary in 2004. The organization was founded by Tim Duffy who was distressed “over the living conditions of the living legends he was meeting in the early 1990s as he explored the world of blues musicians.” The organization focuses on helping down-and-out blues musicians overcome destitution and in so doing help them to rediscover their voices and perform again.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p30-33, il, por Periodical Website
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6692
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Among the people of Chatham County he was known as “Ike,” a self-made man, loyal to his neighbors and his community. To the world he was known as Captain Isaac Edward Emerson, the inventor of Bromo-Seltzer, founder of the Emerson Drug Company, builder of the Emerson Hotel, veteran of the Spanish-American War, noted yachtsman, fancier of automobiles, lavish entertainer, and philanthropist.
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6697
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Gimpel discusses the Penland School of Crafts, a nationally known center for craft education. Founded in the 1920s by Lucy Morgan as a weaving school, it has grown in its seventy-five years into a cultural gem for the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p84-86, 88-89, il Periodical Website
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6702
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Ruth Russell Williams of Henderson relies on her memory of a rural upbringing as the source and inspiration for her paintings. Williams, who never had any formal art instruction, began painting some thirty years ago “as a way to try something new.” Her work has been compared by some to that of Grandma Moses. Williams's work is much in demand, and large originals can sell for $6,000. Television shows buy prints to use on their sets; a Mazda commercial featured one; and a recently published book, FORTY ACRES AND A MULE, will feature a painting on the cover.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p102-105, il, por Periodical Website
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6704
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Virginia Dare was the first English child born in the New World. Visitors to the Elizabethan Gardens in Manteo have seen the statue depicting her as an adult, but few know the remarkable journey it took to get there. Jackson chronicles how the statue was sculpted in Italy in the 1850s by Maria Lander of Massachusetts; went down in a shipwreck off the Spanish coast; survived a fire in a New York studio; alarmed North Carolinians when the semi-nude figure appeared in front of the Capitol building; and finally came to the vicinity of Dare's birth.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p138-139, 141, il Periodical Website
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6700
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Robert Seven did not set out to become a folk artist. At 28 he joined the Air Force and was a computer operator at the Pentagon. Later he did computer work for the North Carolina Department of Commerce, but downsizing left him without a job. With time on his hands, he began soldering spoons and forks into jewelry and sculpture, which earned him the title “Spoonman.” His work covers many areas, such as bead projects and musical boxes, but he is most famous for his fork and spoon creations. Now 48, Seven lives in Candler in Buncombe County.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p90-92, 94, il, por Periodical Website
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6705
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Vance County is OUR STATE magazine's featured county of the month. The county was created after the Civil War for political reasons and named for Confederate Colonel Zebulon Vance, who was also the wartime governor. The county has many recreational opportunities and features Kerr Lake, one of the largest man-made lakes east of the Mississippi River. The county's location near an interstate keeps business strong. Vance Furniture, IAMS, a national pet food maker, and Royal Home Fashions are major employers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p142-145, il Periodical Website
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6707
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Founded in 1982 by Marilyn Meacham Price, the Charlotte Folk Society keeps traditional music, dance, crafts, and lore alive for future generations. The group entertains and educates local residents through free concerts, public jam sessions, and educational programs for young and old. The society feels that if the young do not learn about and embrace the folk traditions, these traditions will not survive; therefore, youth education is seen as a prime responsibility of the organization.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p132-134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6703
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Frank Holder of Lewisville creates sculptures from discarded nuts, bolts, heavy machinery parts, and other pieces of scrap. A welder with the RJ Reynolds Company for thirty years, he has no formal art training but can make objects from almost anything. Shovels turn into ducks; old pipes become dachshunds. His work is sold through a number of galleries both in and out of state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p112-114, 116, il, por Periodical Website
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6706
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Southerners can't live without them. Northerners wonder “What is that disgusting stuff?” It's grits, a dish ingrained in North Carolina's culinary heritage. Kerr discusses the appeal of this delicacy and two mills still producing it, the Dellinger Grist Mill, built in 1867 in Hawk, and The Old Mill of Guilford, established in 1767 in Oak Ridge. Both mills are on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 1, June 2004, p152-154, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6701
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Founded in 1994 by Feather Phillips, Pocosin Arts is a combination of studios, workshops, and gift shop that seeks to uncover artistic talent hidden away within the community and to showcase the creativity of Tyrrell County's artists and craftspersons.
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