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8 results for Our State Vol. 71 Issue 2, July 2003
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Record #:
5887
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Many people think theme park when they hear the words Tweetsie Railroad in Blowing Rock, but there actually was a Tweetsie Railroad. Bourknight discusses the line that dates back to 1866 and linked Eastern Tennessee with Western North Carolina. The locomotive that pulls the train at the park is the original engine No. 12 that was purchased from cowboy actor Gene Autry in 1956, restored, and brought to Blowing Rock.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 2, July 2003, p68-70, 72, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5885
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Robroy Farquhar discovered Flat Rock in 1940, and soon moved his theater troupe, the Vagabond Players, from New York City to the North Carolina mountains. Sauls discusses the development of the Flat Rock Playhouse, which the North Carolina General Assembly designated in 1961 as the "State Theater of North Carolina" and which is rated today as one of the nation's top ten summer theaters.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 2, July 2003, p78-80, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
5884
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Timblin discusses the tremendous comeback passenger trains have made in North Carolina. Along with The Carolinian and The Piedmont, both Amtrak trains, the state is considering additional routes in the East. The North Carolina Department of Transportation has begun to restore stations, including those at Hickory, Black Mountain, and Old Fort, and building new ones in Asheville and Valdese.
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Record #:
5880
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A vacation trip that Karen Tiede took to Antarctica led to an artistic opportunity. While there, she drew and photographed penguins. Returning home to Chatham County, she turned her observations into carved penguins. However, these penguins are carved with a chain saw and weigh from 60 to 400 pounds. Tiede discusses her penguin art.
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Record #:
5881
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Jackson County is 491-square-miles of scenic beauty. Ahuja describes how to spend a perfect weekend there, having high stakes fun at Harrah's Cherokee Casino, hiking mountain trails, viewing numerous waterfalls, and enjoying a wealth of activities in nearby towns of Balsam, Cashiers, Dillsboro, and Sylva.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 2, July 2003, p130-133, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5886
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There are ten minor league baseball teams playing in North Carolina in 2003. Caldwell gives a synopsis of each team, including the Asheville Tourists, Durham Bulls, and Kinston Indians.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 2, July 2003, p90-92, 94, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5888
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Roxboro, located in Person County. is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month. Comer discusses a number of the town's sites, including the National Register Historic District, and famous people who lived there, such as Enos Slaughter, St. Louis Cardinals major league baseball player, and Robert Lester Blackwell, the first North Carolinian to win the Medal of Honor in World War I.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 2, July 2003, p18-20, 22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5893
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The New River, which flows about 100 miles through western North Carolina, is at 300 million years, second only to the Nile River in age. A dam threatened the river with extinction in 1965, but legal and legislative action over a ten-year period saved it. In 1975, the North Carolina General Assembly declared 26.5 miles a State Scenic River. In 1976, the federal government declared the same stretch part of the National Wetland and Scenic River System.
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