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14 results for Our State Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000
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4813
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The Pee Dee Indians vanished from the Sandhills in the 1400s and their culture lay buried beneath cornfields in Montgomery County until 1937, when the state recognized the value of the site and purchased it. Excavated for nearly fifty years by Joffre Coe, the Town Creek Indian Mound is the only North Carolina Historic Site devoted exclusively to Native American history. The site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.
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4815
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The nation's two largest political parties share their names with two North Carolina communities, Democrat in Buncombe County and Republican in Bertie County. While one expects Democrat to be full of Democrats, it doesn't work that way in Republican, which is also full of Democrats. Of the 859 voters there, only 54 are registered Republicans. Tomlin recounts interesting anecdotes about the towns.
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4809
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Collene Karcher practices a dying art - stone carving. Initially, she wanted to be a painter but decided to work in stone. She was 23 before she found a master stone carver and apprenticed under him. She has been carving for the past 17 years; her studio is near Sylva. She has exhibited in galleries in Charlotte, Raleigh, and Asheville, and has assisted with the restoration of the Texas, Ohio, and Michigan state capitol buildings.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p28-30, 32-33, il Periodical Website
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4811
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The Balsam Mountain Inn, a resort hotel at Balsam; the Richmond Hill Inn, a grand Victorian mansion in Asheville; the Holly Inn, a Pinehurst retreat; and the First Colony Inn, a coastal inn at Nags Head, all treasured landmarks, have been restored and returned to their former glories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p156-162, 164-165, il Periodical Website
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4810
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Besides the Eastern Cherokees, who are a federally recognized tribe living in North Carolina, the state also recognizes six other tribes. They are the Coharie, Haliwa- Saponi, Lumbees, Waccamaw-Sioua, Meherrin, and Indians of Person County. Currently six other groups are seeking recognition as Indian tribes.
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4814
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While a large Lumbee Indian population lives in and around the town of Pembroke in Robeson County, the people are not interested in turning their culture into a tourist attraction. Still there is much to see and learn in the town. Martin describes a day tour of the city.
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4812
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Powwows were created by Plains Indians in the early 20th-century as a celebration of community pride and identity. The concept soon spread to other Native Americans around the nation. North Carolina Indians adopted it during the 1960s. A listing of powwows in the state is included.
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4820
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Built in 1938 in Ocracoke and first known as the Wahab Village Hotel, Blackbeard's Lodge was once the place to stay. The building had electricity, a skating rink, the island's only movie theater, and an elegant dining room. However, the island's oldest hotel fell victim to neglect over the years. Today it has a new owner, who plans to restore it to its former life.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p137-140, il Periodical Website
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4819
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Built in 1874, the Briggs Building in Raleigh was the tallest in Eastern Carolina. Briggs Hardware occupied it from 1874 to 1995. When the store moved, the building stood empty for two years and was damaged by Hurricane Fran. A grant spearheaded by the A.J. Fletcher Foundation restored the building during 1997 and 1998. Currently the Raleigh City Museum occupies the basement and first floor, and three nonprofit groups occupy the other three floors.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p134-136, il Periodical Website
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4821
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The 200-year-old Dinkins House in Charlotte, once a tavern on a stagecoach line, but now abandoned and crumbling, was in danger of demolition from nearby commercial development. Rescued by Jim and Judy Boyd, who moved it to their property, the house was painstakingly restored and functions now as their family homestead. The Historic Landmarks Commission awarded historic designation to the original and renovated sections of the Dinkins' house.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p144-147, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4822
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Jules Gilmer Korner was known for painting Bull Durham bulls on Southern barns, but it was the home he built in Kernersville in 1880 that is his legacy. Dubbed \"Korner's Folly,\" the red brick building stands 100 feet high, has seven stories, and is a wonder of opulence, oddity, detail, and combined architectural styles. The 22-room mansion is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p150-152, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4816
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Stretching across the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Florida to New Jersey are around 500,000 elliptical depressions known as Carolina bays. Over half of them are found in eastern Carolina. The bays are a land feature that exist nowhere else in the world. No one knows how they were formed. Some have water; others are dry. Lake Waccamaw is the largest of the bays, being about five miles long.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p82-84, 86, il Periodical Website
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4817
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Book clubs number around 500 in North Carolina, with more forming every day. Some are formal, others more casual. All form because of a love of books. Book clubs are not a recent happening. Barnhill describes the Booklovers Club of Davidson College, formed in 1899, and Philocalian Book Club of Winston-Salem, started in 1910. More recent clubs include the Sunday Afternoon Book Club of Kernersville and the African-American Discussion Group in Durham.
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4818
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Knight describes examples of North Carolina's distinctive architecture, including Asheville's Biltmore Estate, grand, showy 19th-century courthouses, the Executive Mansion in Raleigh, the Zebulon Vance Monument in Asheville, and an 85-foot- tall \"highboy\" in High Point.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 6, Nov 2000, p130-133, il Periodical Website
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