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9 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999
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Record #:
4335
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Abstract:
One of the most enterprising individual's in the state's history was Ocracoke native Stanley Wahab. Leaving the island to get a higher education and to make his fortune, Wahab returned in the 1930s to bring Ocracoke out of its isolation. Among the numerous things he did were building Wahab Village, the light plant, and ice house; building modern hotels, motels, and cottages; financing the Ocracoke- Hatteras ferry and bus line; and establishing a flying service between Manteo and Ocracoke.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4337
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Chatham County native Mildred Cotton Council, known to legions of hungry people as \"Mama Dip,\" is an institution on Chapel Hill's Rosemary Street. There in her restaurant she has prepared her own style of Southern cooking since 1976. She has written a cookbook, Mama Dip's Kitchen, markets her own line of products, and has appeared on national television.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999, p42-47, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4336
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In 1995, Jean Dugan was elected principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokees. She is the first woman to hold the position. Dugan restructured the tribal government and established stringent financial controls. Her predecessor was impeached on charges of misusing funds. In the fall 1999 election, she was upset in her bid for reelection.
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Record #:
4332
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Falcon in Cumberland County is small in numbers, with a population of only 369, but large in faith and service to others. The Pentecostal Holiness Church was founded there on January 31, 1911, in the Octagon Tabernacle. Religious camp meetings began in 1900 and continue to this day. An idea for an orphanage originated from a 1908 camp meeting. The Falcon Orphanage, now the Falcon Children's Home, still operates.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999, p13-14, 16-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4338
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Eleanor Newton Gillette grew up in Farmville in Pitt County. Realizing that the scenes of her childhood might one day be gone, either through new development or neglect, Gillette began twelve years ago to photograph such vanishing things as old barns, country stores, and abandoned homes.
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Record #:
4339
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Macon County is the seventh fastest-growing county in the state. Between 1990 and 1998, the people moving into the county accounted for over 21 percent of its population growth. Most came from the larger cites of the North and South. Such growth fuels service and retail sectors, which helps to offset the decline in the county's manufacturing jobs. While some residents fear the influx of people, the prohibition against building on the county's 152,000 acres of national forest helps to control population sprawl.
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Record #:
4340
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The Gorges is the state's newest park and the first created west of Asheville. The 6,800-acre park in Transylvania County, established in April 1999, boasts spectacular gorges, breathtaking waterfalls, and deep forests. Over 1,000 plant species, 80 of them rare, flourish in this environment. Ecologists consider the protection of this area as significant as the creation of the Great Smoky Mountain National Park in 1926.
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Record #:
4343
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No one knows why the Roanoke Island colonists mysteriously disappeared. A number of theories abound as to the fate of the Lost Colony, including destruction from a hurricane; drought in the early stages of the colony as evidenced by a study of tree rings; massacre by hostile Native Americans; and attack from the Spanish who were at war with England.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999, p122-124, 126-128, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4341
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A number of pharmacists are adding an apothecary technique from years past to their offerings - compounding their patients' medications. Compounding gives the pharmacist options, such as customizing dosages, eliminating preservatives, flavoring the medication, and providing a number of ways to deliver the medication, such as gels or sprays.
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