NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Our State Vol. 66 Issue 6, Nov 1998
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
3872
Author(s):
Abstract:
Robert Edward Simpson of Morganton is representative of all the young men and women who were called to service in World War II and are remembered each November 11. A popular student and athlete in high school, he joined the Marines after graduation in 1944. He was killed in action March 8, 1945, on Iwo Jima.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 6, Nov 1998, p91-95, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
3874
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winston-Salem's Graylyn Estate, built as a private residence by Bowman Gray, Sr. in the 1920s, is one of the country's best examples of Norman Revival architecture. Now owned by Wake Forest University, the 98-room estate is a world-class conference center.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 6, Nov 1998, p102-104, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
3873
Author(s):
Abstract:
Just minutes from downtown Raleigh, William B. Umstead State Park is 5,000 acres of woodland sanctuary surrounded by hectic urban living. Created during the Great Depression, it is one of the most popular recreational areas near the city.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
3871
Abstract:
Eight country churches, including Saxapahaw United Methodist Church in Alamance County and Mill Creek Christian Church in Johnston County, are representative of places that are quiet havens from a hectic world, yet at the same time strong, influential voices in the lives of their parishioners.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
3870
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mount Pleasant in Cabarrus County, population 1,400, blends historical preservation with the present. First called Mount Comfort in the late 1700s, the town contains many historical buildings and churches as well as a modern medical center, library, and high school.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
5779
Author(s):
Abstract:
People, places, and things we grew up with give us a sense of place in time. Across the state many of these things, including service station attendants, clotheslines, downtown movie houses, soda fountains in drugstores, and dialects, are slowly disappearing from the scene.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text: