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9 results for Our State Vol. 66 Issue 5, Oct 1998
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Record #:
3903
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The culture, history, and food of three Davidson County cities have much to offer visitors. The furniture mecca of Thomasville is also home to the world's largest chair; Lexington claims to be the state's barbecue capital; and Spencer is home to Historic Spencer Shops, which retells the days of the steam engine and trains.
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3902
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Princeville, located in Edgecombe County, has a unique place in history. It is the first town in the country incorporated by Afro-Americans. A place rich in history, it celebrated its centennial in 1995. New town leadership seeks to capitalize on this legacy by revitalizing the town to attract tourists and retirees.
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3904
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Held each year in Raleigh, the state fair signals the end of summer and the beginning of fall. It is also a reminder to fair visitors of a time a hundred years ago when a large segment of the population lived on farms and depended on them for their livelihood.
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3910
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Built on Bogue Banks in the early 19th-century for coastal defense and to protect Beaufort harbor, Fort Macon fired its guns in anger only once -- during the Civil War. Today it is a 385-acre state park that attracts one million visitors annually.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 5, Oct 1998, p74-77,79-80,82, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3907
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Late October is the time of ghosts and goblins, of things that glow in the dark or go bump in the night, and a dog howling in the distance. Four creepy Tar Heel tales capture the spookiness of Halloween.
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Record #:
3905
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When the N.C. Agricultural Society was planning the first state fair in 1853, there were those who scoffed and predicted failure. Undaunted, the group completed plans and held the fair. Large throngs attended and the nay-sayers were proven wrong.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 5, Oct 1998, p44-45,47-48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3906
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Gov. John Motley Morehead, born on July 4, 1796, was one of the state's most visionary leaders of the early 19th-century. Among his many ideas were a highway system, a port at Beaufort, the North Carolina Railroad, schools for the blind and deaf, and navigable rivers.
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3909
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While Henderson County is considered the state's apple capital, apples are not the only attraction. There are festivals, including the North Carolina Apple Festival; Hendersonville's downtown district; and historic sites, including Carl Sandburg's home at Flat Rock.
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3908
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Nancy Roberts is one of the South's foremost compilers of tales of ghosts and the supernatural. Over a period of almost forty years, she has recounted her tales in twenty-three books.
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