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13 results for Our State Vol. 66 Issue 12, May 1999
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Record #:
4111
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Until the 1820s, flames reflecting off a mirrored surface fired lighthouse beacons around the world. Around 1815, French civil engineer Augustin Fresnel designed a system to use prisms to refract light and focus a powerful beam. The United States resisted using the new system for years, until it proved to be cost- effective. The first of four Fresnel lenses was installed at Cape Hatteras in 1854. Fresnel lenses were used at Hatteras until 1935, when the lighthouse closed.
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4108
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Charlotte native Charles Duke, Jr., is one of only twelve earthmen to walk on the moon. Selected by NASA for astronaut training in 1996, Duke and two other astronauts flew the Apollo 16 mission, which landed on the moon April 20, 1972. Duke retired from the space program in 1975.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 12, May 1999, p24-26, 28-29, il Periodical Website
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4109
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The eight coastal lighthouses are among the state's best-known symbols. However, they are not the state's only lights. Beacon lights were used at Ocracoke Inlet as early as 1715, and through the years, almost 30 other lighthouses and light ships have guided mariners. Most have been lost to warfare, neglect, and weather, so that only eight remain at the end of the 20th-century.
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4110
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Solutions to saving Cape Hatteras Lighthouse from the encroaching Atlantic have been controversial. Those who favor moving the lighthouse back from the ocean have prevailed. The move will begin in June, 1999, and should be completed by the end of July. On Memorial Day, May 29, 2000, the lighthouse will reopen to the public.
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4129
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Raleigh native Andrew Johnson was the first president to be impeached. He angered many in congress by trying to carry out Abraham Lincoln's Reconstruction policies. Though charges were brought against him in 1868, he was not convicted. In 1875, he became to first and only president to return to congress when the Tennessee legislature elected him by one vote.
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4128
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Once known as Baird's Forge and later as Lovelady, Granite Falls, in Caldwell County, was incorporated May 1, 1889. It is marking its one hundredth anniversary with a year full of special festivities and ceremonies.
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4137
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The Outer Banks Pea Island Lifesaving Station was the nation's only station manned by African Americans. Operating from the late 19th-century until 1947, when machines made rowboats obsolete, the surfmen aided over 30 distressed ships and saved over 200 people. Their most famous rescue was saving the crew of the hurricane-ravaged schooner E.S. NEWMAN on October 11, 1896.
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4138
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Merchants Millpond State Park in Gates County is a 3,200-acre wildlife refuge that includes almost 200 bird species, beavers, otters, and 12 species of turtles. It is also home to some of the oldest trees on the east coast. Bald cypress and water tupelo between 700 and 1,000 years old tower over 100 feet on trunks 20 feet in diameter.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 12, May 1999, p72-76, 78, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4136
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In 1868, Dexter Stetson, an experienced lighthouse builder, came from New England to build lighthouses at Cape Hatteras and Bodie Island. His work finished, he vanished into history. Now one hundred years to the date of his death, the man who built the East Coast's best lighthouses has been rediscovered.
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4139
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Incorporated in 1723, Beaufort, in Carteret County, is the state's third oldest city. It is also a mecca for tourists, with attractions that include historic homes, specialty shops, shipbuilding, the Old Burying Ground, and the N.C. Maritime Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 12, May 1999, p80-83, 85, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4146
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Colonel David Coleman of Buncombe County, leader of the 39th NC Regiment of Volunteers during the Civil War, is one of the least known of the state's heroes. Although he fought in a number of battles, it was the Battle of Chickamauga that gave him his shining moment. With his brigade commander wounded and second-in-command killed, Coleman took command, leading thousands of troops against a strong Yankee artillery position. His courageous action contributed to the Confederate victory.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 12, May 1999, p87-90, 92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4145
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From June 26 to July 4, 1999, the Research Triangle Metropolitan Area will host the 1999 Special Olympics World Summer Games. Seven thousand athletes 150 countries will compete in nineteen sports. North Carolina has the largest delegation, with 112 competitors.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 12, May 1999, p58-60, 62,64, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4144
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Rany Jennette's father, Unaka, was the last keeper of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. He was its principal keeper from 1919 to 1933, when a severe hurricane discouraged the family from staying on. Today at 77, Rany is a summer ranger at the Cape Hatteras National Seashore and shares his experiences of growing up at a lighthouse station.
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