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10 results for Our State Vol. 66 Issue 11, Apr 1999
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Record #:
3964
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Murfreesboro, named for Irish immigrant William Murfree, who donated the land in 1787, has based its e economy on agriculture for years. Now its historic district and past, featuring colonial homes, festivals, Candlelight Christmas Tours, and the Jefcoat Museum, are expanding the economy.
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4106
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Through her prominent position in Washington, DC society, Mrs. Rose O'Neal Greenhow was able to gather information of value to the South during the Civil War. Imprisoned by the North, then later deported to Richmond, she went to Europe in 1862 to try to win support for the Southern cause. On her return in 1864, her ship ran aground off Wilmington, and she drowned attempting to reach shore.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 11, Apr 1999, p17-18, 20-21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4113
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For couples seeking an inexpensive way to get married, the state's many wedding chapels can afford an answer, providing ministers, flowers, bridal shops, and unique ceremonies, all for a modest price. The Sunshine Wedding Chapel (Cumberland County), Domestic Bliss (Wilmington), Tweed's Wedding Chapel (Buncombe County), Smithfield Wedding Chapel (Johnston County), and the Crystal Wedding Chapel (Blowing Rock) are profiled.
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4112
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The movie industry started in Wilmington in 1983 when Frank Capra, Jr. selected parts of it for the film Firestarter and Dino deLaurentis later built a studio to make his own films. With a film infrastructure now in place, the city did more movie business in 1997 than forty-five states.
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4107
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Born in the small town of Dothan in Columbus County, sisters Annie Laurie Cox Willard and Nina Gertrude Cox Lane are two of Wilmington's most knowledgeable and respected authorities on how to grow and nurture beautiful plants and gardens.
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4114
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During the 1930s, the state endured the depths of the Great Depression. President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal legislation pumped millions of dollars into the economy, which resulted in projects including the Appalachian Trail, Blue Ridge Parkway, tree planting to control erosion, and building courthouses. Much of the work was done, not by heavy equipment, but by men with shovels.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 11, Apr 1999, p66-70, 72-74, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4122
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Established in 1979, the N.C. State University College of Veterinary Medicine is the only veterinary school in the state. Ranked fifth in the nation by U.S. News and World Report, the school is known internationally for cancer research, cardiology, ophthalmology, and intensive care. Competition of admission is fierce, with only 73 chosen from 1,152 applicants for the 2002 graduating class.
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4115
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The North Carolina Zoological Park is marking its twenty-fifth anniversary in 1999. Having opened in 1974 with a forty-acre Interim Zoo, the park now covers 1,450 acres and features over 1,100 animals and 60,000 plants.
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4123
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One of the state's greatest attractions to movie makers is its geographic diversity, featuring mountains and coasts, with big cities and skyscrapers, quaint towns, and farms sprinkled in between. Filmmaking began soon after the N.C. Film Office opened in 1980. Since then over 450 films have been made that have added $5 billion to the economy.
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4619
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Airlie Gardens in Wilmington passed through several owners, and each added his special touch. Once visited only by the social elite, the gardens opened to the public when W.A. Corbett purchased them in 1947. Home to the 150-year-old Airlie live oak and other Southern flora, Airlie Gardens almost fell prey to developers. They were saved through the efforts of C. Bruce Williams, who helped the New Hanover County Commissioners purchase them from the Corbett family in 1999 for $10.5 million. The gardens are currently under restoration.
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