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8 results for Our State Vol. 65 Issue 3, Aug 1997
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Record #:
3397
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Asheville's Biltmore Avenue has had a renaissance after declining through the early 1980s. Today crowds fill the shops; art galleries, including Blue Spiral Gallery; theater; museum; and restaurants, including the Blue Moon Bakery, that line the street.
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3395
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Settled by Quakers in the 1700s, the Perquimans River town changed its name in 1861 from Newby's Bridge to Belvidere. The river was an important route in the early days, but now most activity takes place at Layden's Supermarket or Red's Trading Post.
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3392
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Tarboro, in Edgecombe County, features a 45-block historic district-one of the state's largest - that includes Calvary Episcopal Church, the Blount-Bridgers House, the 1760 Town Common, and the restored town fountain.
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Record #:
3391
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Honey has been a popular sweetener since ancient times. Many varieties are made in the state, but the three sold most often are sourwood, gallberry, and tulip poplar. The valued honeybee was named official state insect in 1974.
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Record #:
3396
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The successful eradication of the boll weevil and the construction of new cotton gins has led to a resurgence of cotton planting. For example, Halifax County, which planted 16,400 acres in 1985, raised 59,900 in 1995.
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Record #:
3430
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On November 21, 1996, a ship reported to be the QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE, Blackbeard's flagship, was discovered about three miles off the Beaufort-Morehead City area. If confirmed, the find will provide valuable information on pirate life and ships.
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3429
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Among pirates, Blackbeard's fame towered over all. Dressed all in black, his bushy beard smoking with cannon fuses, and armed with six pistols and a cutlass, he inspired terror in all he met. He was killed near Ocracoke in 1718 by the king's navy.
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Record #:
3428
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Edward Teach, called Blackbeard the pirate, terrorized the state's coastal waters in the early 18th-century, creating a trail of legend and folklore before he was killed in 1718, near Ocracoke, fighting the king's navy.
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