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9 results for North Carolina Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005
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Record #:
7240
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Abstract:
A trip to upstate New York by Johnston Memorial Hospital president Leland Farnell developed into an idea of how to solve the hospital's need for more space because of the growing county's needs. There he had seen physicians and medical services housed together in a mall like so many Gaps, Old Navys, and Disney Stores. Smithfield's 1907 Burlington Industries yarn mill was standing empty. The renovated mill is now the two-year-old Johnston County Medical Mall that has a health and fitness center, a café, conference facilities, an auditorium, a cutting-edge wound treatment center, a medical supply company, and space for physician practices. Further expansion of undeveloped areas is planned.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p34-35, il
Record #:
7239
Author(s):
Abstract:
No theme parks, just genuine Americana, is what visitors to Johnston County discover. Smithfield, the county's oldest town and county seat, boasts the Johnston County Heritage Center, an historic district, a new riverwalk along the Neuse River, and the Ava Gardner Museum. Other attractions are the town of Selma, with its restored 1924 Union Depot; Kenly, with its internationally recognized Farm Life Museum; and the Bentonville Civil War battlefield. With the county's rural heritage, agritourism is a natural. Atkinson's Mill, one of the state's last water-powered grist mills, and farms offering tours, petting zoos, and seasonal pick-your-own crops attract tourists.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p28-29, il
Record #:
7238
Author(s):
Abstract:
Johnston County was the state's fastest growing county in 2004 and the fiftieth fastest in the nation. The year was also an outstanding one for business with more than $170 million in new business locations or expansions and creation of over 1,200 new jobs. Formerly an agricultural and low-end manufacturing community, the county focus is now on pharmaceuticals, distribution, and tourism. The county benefits from convenience and accessibility to three major highways, U.S. 70, I-40, and I-95; close proximity to the Raleigh-Durham International Airport; and Wake County and its thriving economy.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p25-26, 30, 32, 36-38, 40, il
Record #:
7237
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reynolda House, built between 1906 and 1917 in Winston-Salem, was the home of tobacco baron Richard Reynolds and his wife Katherine. It opened to the public in 1967 as a museum, one of the first in the country to specialize in American art. The museum has opened a $12 million, three-story addition, the Mary and Charles Babcock Wing, named for the daughter and son-in-law of the Reynolds's. The 30,000-square-foot addition includes galleries, an expanded museum store, and an auditorium.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p10, il
Record #:
7236
Abstract:
Educational opportunities are on the rise in Charlotte's metropolitan area. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is building a $30 million uptown classroom building that will swell enrollment from the present 650 students to 7,500. Wake Forest is moving its Charlotte MBA program from South Park to an uptown, 30,000-square-foot building in 2008. Johnson & Wales, which opened in 2004, expects enrollment to reach 5,000 in 2008.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p6, il
Record #:
7235
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Abstract:
A favorable climate and the availability of retirement havens that stretch from the mountains to the coast attract many retirees to North Carolina. Because retirees are more mobile than those of yesteryear, many of these retirement areas offer golf, luxurious homes, fishing, tennis, spas, and other aspects of the good life.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p12, 14, 17-18, 20, 22, il
Record #:
7242
Author(s):
Abstract:
Outdoor drama as a theatrical genre was born in 1937 in the Tar Heel state when collaboration between the town of Manteo and North Carolina playwright Paul Green resulted in \"The Lost Colony\" production. This play is now the nation's oldest outdoor drama, followed by Cherokee's “Unto These Hills” and Boone's “Horn in the West” in second and third place. In the summer of 2005, nine historical drams will be in production across the state, more than any other state in the country.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p52-53, il
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Record #:
7243
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Abstract:
David Jordan Whichard, III, publisher of Cox North Carolina Publications, Inc., and publisher of the Greenville Daily Reflector, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile. Whichard was recently named chair of the North Carolina Economic Development Board.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p54-57, por
Record #:
7241
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism is the state's second largest industry. In 2004, domestic tourism supported almost 183,000 jobs and generated over $2.1 billion in tax receipts. Over forty-nine million visitors spent $13.2 billion, an increase of 5 percent from 2003.
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