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7 results for North Carolina Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005
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Record #:
7200
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Bivins discusses the sixteen counties that comprise the North Carolina Northeast Partnership. The region extends from the Outer Banks westward to Halifax County and southward to Beaufort and Hyde counties. SITE SELECTION magazine named the area one of the top ten economic development organizations in the nation. While the area is historically significant, it generally has not prospered through the years because of its agrarian landscape, sparsely populated communities, and sheer remoteness from the rest of the state. With improving infrastructure, transportation upgrades, Internet access, and expanding agribusiness and commercial investments, the area is seen as a region on the rise.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p31-33, 35-37, 39-42, il, map
Record #:
7202
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourism is North Carolina's second largest industry. In 2004, forty-nine million people visited the state and spent $13.2 billion. To attract the 87 percent of tourists who travel to the state by car, truck, or RV, regional agencies, together with local and state agencies, have developed themed driving trails that crisscross the state. Trails deal with natural resources, historic sites, arts and crafts, music, food, wine, gardens, and motorsports. The driving trails take travelers to more than seventy destinations, some far off the usual tourist destinations, like Rose Hill and Bear Creek.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p46, 49-51, 54-55, il
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Record #:
7203
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Abstract:
When George Washington Vanderbilt built Biltmore House in the 1890s, he was constructing more than just a large house. He envisioned his 125,000-acre estate as being self-sufficient, growing its own food, weaving its own cloth, and raising its own meat. Wright discusses how this philosophy carries on into the twenty-first century. One million people visit Biltmore annually and spend around $183.4 million. The estate employs 1,500 people, and its economic impact on western North Carolina is about $351 million annually.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p48, il
Record #:
7201
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaches on the Outer Banks are among the finest on the East Coast. Vacationers on the way there often stop to enjoy the rich colonial-era heritage in towns, including Manteo, Hertford, and Edenton. Bivins discusses some of newer attractions opening in the region -- Halifax County's Roanoke Canal Museum & Trail Project in Weldon; the new home of the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City; and the North Carolina Civil War Trails Campaign in Chowan County.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p34, il
Record #:
7204
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Zoological Park, the country's first state-supported zoo, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2004. It is recognized as one of the top zoos in the nation. The zoo was designed as a natural habitat environment zoo without bars. There are over 1,100 animals representing 204 species living there. Wright describes how the zoo has developed and grown over the past thirty years.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p52-53, il
Record #:
7199
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mebane native Frankie T. Jones, Sr., is president and chief operations officer of B & C Associates in High Point. The company is a privately owned management consulting, marketing research, and public relations firm. Between graduation from North Carolina A & T and his present position, Jones spent twenty years in the United States Air Force, retiring as a lieutenant-colonel. Jones is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p24-28, il, por
Record #:
7205
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wright describes the Civil War Trails program, a three-state, federally funded program that seeks to increase recognition of Civil War history at sites in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. In North Carolina the new driving trails recall the state's pivotal role in the Civil War. Over one hundred markers are included in North Carolina's first section of the trail, most of them placed for the very first time. Red, white, and blue signs sporting bugles direct visitors to the sites. Bentonville, Fort Fisher, forts on the Outer Banks, and Plymouth are included in stage one. Second stage markers will focus on the war's action in the western part of the state.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p56-57, il