NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


3 results for North Carolina Naturalist Vol. 7 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1999
Currently viewing results 1 - 3
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4155
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once abundant in the state's waterways, freshwater mussel populations have been reduced by dams, which lower levels of shallow streams where they reside and by silt, which is created in waterways by construction and agriculture and can choke them. Freshwater mussels have a long history in the state, having been enjoyed by Native Americans along the Yadkin River over a thousand years ago.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
4156
Author(s):
Abstract:
Millipedes have lived in what is now North Carolina for millions of years. Ancient mountain ranges gave rise to a large number of species. Today over 100 species of the colorful creature still reside in the Appalachians. While bright colors make them attractive to predators, millipedes produce foul- tasting chemicals that make them unpalatable to their enemies.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
4154
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the state's largest freshwater invertebrates is the crayfish. Thirty-five to forty crayfish species are native to the state, and five of the species are found only in North Carolina. Two of the five live only in the Tar and Neuse river basins. Crayfish are enjoyed by over 125 vertebrates, including raccoons, otters, and bass.
Source:
Subject(s):