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16 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. 1 Issue 2, 1994
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Record #:
21112
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Pulitzer prize-winner Paul Green is best known for his nearly 100 plays for stage and screen, most notably The Lost Colony about the lost English colony on Roanoke Island, North Carolina. While not what he is mostly known for, Green was also a documentarian who collected mounds of data on the life history of the people of the Cape Fear Valley and documented language usage as early as World War I. Green's estate posthumously published Paul Green's Wordbook, a two-volume, 1,245 page tome which included decades of his research on the Cape Fear Valley.
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Record #:
21113
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Playwright Paul Green is well known in North Carolina as the writer of the play, The Lost Colony, which portrays the story of the lost English colony on Roanoke Island. Born in rural Harnett County in 1894, Green pushed for a more progressive North Carolina, especially with regards to the civil rights of African-Americans. In addition to his liberal reputation, Green also served in the American Expeditionary Forces in France during World War I as a mining engineer during the height of trench warfare.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, 1994, p22-46, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
21122
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Since its creation in 1991, the North Carolina Playwrights Festival has had an overarching goal of connecting playwrights and their plays with theaters or directors with the means to find venues and actors. The festival took place in Southern Pines and provided an outlet for over 20 plays to local and regional distributors. The schedule of the festival also included formal readings, breakfast seminars, casting, rehearsals, performances, and workshops.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, 1994, p217-218, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
21117
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Thomas Dixon Jr.'s first fictional work, The Leopard's Spots, spins the tale of white manhood lost and regained in post-Civil War North Carolina. While portrayed as a truthful account of Reconstruction with Dixon as the ideal Southern gentleman, The Leopard's Spots more often than not twists the reality southern life to create villains out of African-Americans and noble heroes out of white Southerners.
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Record #:
21119
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Charles Chesnutt's second novel, The Marrow of Tradition, published in 1901, is a fictional account of the 1898 Wilmington Race Riot. Chesnutt hoped that through his writing, he could enlighten other Americans, especially non-Southerners, to the problem of race plaguing America.
Record #:
21116
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The 1898 Wilmington Race Riot, a low point in African-Americans' treatment after the Civil War, is generally recognized as the onset of the Jim Crow era in North Carolina. This narrative conveys the events leading up to, during, and after the riots.
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Record #:
21115
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Author Margaret Maron, early short story writer, has achieved her greatest success as an author of 10 novels including two mystery series: the Sigrid Harald novels and the Deborah Knott series. In this interview with NCLR, Maron discusses her writing career including how it began, where it has gone, where it is going to go, and how it connects to North Carolina.
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Record #:
21121
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The small village of Eden Mills in Canada is home to the Eden Mills Writers' Festival and to Chapel Hill natives, Connie and Leon Rooke, who started the festival in 1989. The Rookes founded the festival as a means to give established and burgeoning artists a forum to spread their art.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, 1994, p211-212, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
21118
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Walter Hines Page is a well-known North Carolinian who served as ambassador to Great Britain during World War I. Previously, Page was a publisher and editor who was concerned about education and social reform in the South.
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Record #:
21120
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In this interview writer and 1993 Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize winner Charles Wright reflects upon his childhood in North Carolina and how it has affected his writing.
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Record #:
21125
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As a Japanese-American from Hawaii, I.S. Nakata was far away from home when he first attended Black Mountain College in 1940. His first experiences with Jim Crow, university studies, and with the continental United States all took place at the college. These experiences were cut short by the United States' entry into World War II, when Nakata was drafted into the Army Air Corp. After being honorably discharged in 1942, he returned to Black Mountain College to finish his studies and married fellow student Alexa McLane.
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Record #:
21127
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The unique maritime culture of North Carolina has been an inspiration for naturalists, folklorists, historians, poets and novelists for centuries as they have been drawn to the coasts. A strong North Carolina fishing culture initially drew many people, however, pollution, over-development, and poor fishery management, the culture is in decline. Writers and historians continue to record and preserve this culture in their respective works.
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Record #:
21128
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North Carolinian Harrell Paden began visiting secluded Holden Beach near Wilmington when he was four-years-old in 1928. When he returned in 1985 after an absence of several years, he was shocked to find that there was no longer a public access route to the beach. Private housing communities have developed and cut off public access to several local beaches, while still using public funds and utilities.
Record #:
21124
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Black Mountain College was founded by several recently fired professors in 1933 during the Great Depression in a region that did not clamor for a liberal arts college and did not have the economy to support it.
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Record #:
21126
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In this interview with writer and Black Mountain College alum Fielding Dawson, the interviewer meant to only discuss Dawson's recently released The Black Mountain Book. The interview quickly become one not so much about the book, but about Black Mountain College itself and the time that Fielding spent there.
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