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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 74 Issue 3, July 1997
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Record #:
21536
Abstract:
A look at the lives and careers of scholars and married couple Guion Griffis and Guy Johnson, whose careers studying the history and culture of their native South demonstrate that male and female intellectuals of the early 20th century lived very different southern experiences. Guy's professional positions heightened his visibility and a more prominent place within the historiography of Southern liberalism, while Guion's distance from those same circles made her the more perceptive observer and passionate critic of the multiple barriers to change in the South. When viewed in combination, the stories of both scholars reveal the linked challenges of race and gender within southern liberalism.
Record #:
21533
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the Appalachian Southern identity during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Contrary to 20th century historians' ideas of Civil War-era Appalachia as the pre-modern, unionist, and anti-slavery society, an analysis of a 1911 Waynesville, North Carolina, reception for the widow of Confederate hero Thomas J. \"Stonewall\" Jackson demonstrates that Appalachian communities not only supported the Confederacy but retained a strong identification with the myth of the \"Lost Cause\" into the 1910s. In the 1890s and 1910s reunions of Confederate veterans and celebrations of their military service were central to the public life of Haywood County, North Carolina.
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Record #:
21535
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the life and experience of Cornelia Phillips Spencer, a well-educated, Southern white woman who lived on the margin of plantation society as the daughter of a University professor who owned two slaves prior to the Civil War. Spencer was recognized and respected as a knowledgeable political voice and wrote regularly on contemporary women's issues in newspaper columns. She was in a position to use her position and pen to influence social change; however, her writing reveals a woman working to shape and solidify cultural and social conservatism and a reinforcement of antebellum values, gender roles, and societal views, as well as a nostalgia and affection for the pre-war Southern social constructs.
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