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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 74 Issue 1, Jan 1997
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Record #:
21518
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Abstract:
A look at the evolution of the Duke Endowment, created by James B. Duke in 1924, as it has succeeded in maintaining its founder's concern for education and health care despite the termination of its relationship with the Duke Power Company. In the early 1970s, the endowment's board wanted to sell its stock in Duke Power and diversify its portfolio, however the resistance of Doris Duke and a revival of utility stocks in the 1980s tabled those plans until after her death in 1993. The trustees have managed the endowment creatively and in accordance with the philanthropic intention of its founder, but James Duke's plan for \"perpetual philanthropy\" funded by Duke Power Company dividends has ended.
Record #:
21520
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article concentrates on the efforts made to improve the navigability of watercourses - rivers and streams - within the state in the years between the American Revolution and the Civil War. Additional attention is given to the role of government, particularly that of the state of North Carolina, as a political force that energized improvements for the benefit of the people first through the \"quasi-public corporation\" system of encouraging private corporations to undertake navigation improvements, and then eventually moving to direct investment in corporate enterprises while assuming responsibility for supervising the more important navigation projects.
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Record #:
21519
Author(s):
Abstract:
An examination of two neglected accounts of the Anglo-Cherokee War of 1760-61 by Thomas Mante and James Boswell that clarify General Archibald Montgomerie's 1760 decision to halt his campaign short of relieving the besieged Fort Loudon. Mante and Boswell depict Montgomerie as an accomplished combat leader who correctly decided not to sacrifice his men in a possibly futile expedition as well as to preserve the regiment for the more important struggle against the French.
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