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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 71 Issue 4, Oct 1994
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21601
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This article examines the ending and the fallout of the three year struggle at Duke University between President Arthur Hollis Edens and Vice-President of Education Paul Gross. Gross and his allies on the Duke Endowment Fund forced Edens to resign in 1960 after he refused to accept an appointment as chancellor. Gross had previously campaigned against Edens by stating he opposed plans to make Duke a top national school which angered trustees who forced Edens from his post. This situation led to reforms at Duke University that clarified administrative positions and authority, and included the creation of a university provost position.
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Record #:
21599
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In an 1822 effort to segregate their congregation, Moravian Church officials in Salem, North Carolina, established a separate nondenominational black Christian church. White parishioners established the black church as a way to maintain cultural control, but they also feared large gatherings of blacks and were afraid the church would provide a nest to incite slave rebellions. The services were under the direction of Moravian minister Abraham Gottlieb Steiner, but blacks often led services and attended Methodist camp meetings. The segregated church provided members with a unique semblance of family and community.
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Record #:
21600
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During the Antebellum Period, mountain farmers in the Appalachian region of Ashe County lived in a fairly isolated area but took part in the growing market economy on an increasingly regular basis. While large-scale farmers grew the majority of commercial crops, most mountain farmers traded and sold their surplus crops to local and regional markets. In the 1850s, these mountain farmers cultivated more of their land for commercial crops in response to population growth while still maintaining diversity and self-sufficiency.
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