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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 70 Issue 3, July 1993
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Record #:
21462
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A look at the US government's first attempts to recruit Southern blacks for Civil War duty beginning in the spring of 1863 in North Carolina with plans to recruit four regiments. The North Carolina brigade was short-lived as attitudes, goals, and priorities swiftly changed in late 1863 and early 1864 and overshadowed the original progressive ideas. Though blacks chose to serve voluntarily and were grudgingly accepted by a white army, the black state units became pawns in a larger struggle and lost their individuality as they were absorbed into the larger US Colored Troops Division.
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Record #:
21461
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The first in a series of articles examining the mid-1850s dispute between Congressman Thomas Lanier Clingman and Professor of Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Elisha Mitchell, over who had been the first to identify, ascend, and measure the highest peak in the Black Mountains in Yancey County. The debate took a tragic turn when, in June 1857, Mitchell returned to the Mountains to vindicate his claim and lost his footing and fell to his death.
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Record #:
21466
Abstract:
A look at the efforts to improve collegiate education of white women at the turn of the 20th century as an example of the disparate impact of Southern progressivism upon education. In their desire to pattern the educational institutions of the New South, developed between 1890 and 1920, along the traditional racial, gender, and class divisions and roles of the Old South, Progressive reformers illustrated the paradoxical character of Southern social reform of this period.
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