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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 67 Issue 3, July 1990
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Record #:
21543
Abstract:
This article looks at the life of Bladen County resident John Legett, as a loyalist in exile in Nova Scotia between 1783 and 1812. During the Revolutionary War, Legett led one of the few loyalist brigades in the South. After the war, some loyalists were given free land grants in Nova Scotia by the British government. Legett and his followers were given County Harbour in Nova Scotia, where Legett persevered over the many hardships that occurred to him in an effort to build a new life and properly discharge his duties as magistrate.
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Record #:
21548
Author(s):
Abstract:
A continuation from a prior entry, this article continues to examine the legal battle over the will of North Carolinian James Cathcart Johnston. After his death in 1865, Johnston left his estate to three of his closest friends, not to his family. A family member contested the will in what became a sensational and prominent legal contest. The main issue of the will contested was whether or not Johnston was mentally fit to compose a will which left out his family members. After testimony from several doctors, the will was upheld and the estate was left in the control of his friends.
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Record #:
21544
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at famous North Carolina politicians who opposed suffrage for women in 1920. These politicians were led the campaign to alienate black voters 20 years prior. The most prominent of these politicians were Alfred M. Waddell, George Rountree, and Furnifold M. Simmons. While the campaign to stop women's suffrage was a diverse one and included many women, Waddell, Rountree, and Simmons were the political force behind the efforts to deny women the vote.