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4 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 59 Issue 4, Oct 1982
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Record #:
21423
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Abstract:
Before 1886, the libraries of the University of North Carolina were inferior to the private libraries of two students' groups, the Dialectic Society and the Philanthropic Society. Similar at the time to many American universities as they modernized their curriculum, the university and the student societies worked together. Between 1886 and 1906, the two societies worked with the university to merge all their collections together under the banner of the university library. The societies also contributed funds to purchase books and periodicals, helped administer the collections, and provided endowment funds.
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Record #:
21424
Author(s):
Abstract:
Throughout his career in public service, William Woods Holden was a very controversial figure. During his tenure as governor of North Carolina, Holden angered the opposition by his response and actions against the violence of the Ku Klux Klan, the violation of political rights in the Piedmont region, and by several reckless political situations. In 1870, the General Assembly impeached Holden and convicted him of violating the civil liberties of certain citizens. This ruling barred him from ever holding public office again and he spent the rest of his life unsuccessfully attempting to repeal his disbarment and impeachment.
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Record #:
21421
Abstract:
The Tuscarora Indians have often been viewed by scholars as only being significant to North Carolina during the Tuscarora War between 1711 and 1713. This is not the case as the Tuscarora dominated the region for over a century, first amongst the Indian groups of the region and then when dealing with European colonists. From the late 1500s to their defeat in 1713, the Tuscarora attempted to maintain control over their territory and trading rights in much of eastern North Carolina. Their presence demarcated the extent of English settlement in North Carolina from 1654 to 1712 and may have influenced several internal conflicts among the colonists.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 59 Issue 4, Oct 1982, p307-326 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
21422
Abstract:
In 1769, map-maker John Abraham Collet provided a short description of Anson County, North Carolina to promote the interior of the state. Collet wrote quite positively about the area on everything from agriculture to roads, even if the information was at sometimes inaccurate.
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