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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 59 Issue 1, Jan 1982
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Record #:
21401
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Abstract:
During the rise of Democrats over Whigs between 1848 and 1850, the possibility that free suffrage might have been repealed, has been deemed by historians to not have been a significant factor. It is has been understood that David S. Reid, Democratic gubernatorial candidate, and William W. Holden, editor on the 'North Carolina Standard,' were able to lure Whigs who opposed free suffrage to the Democratic cause. In actuality, reform issues divided eastern and western Whigs who differed on the free suffrage issue. Holden also used his newspaper to slant Whig perception toward free suffrage in the 1848 and 1850 elections.
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Record #:
21402
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the best known but least demonstrative white North Carolinian with abolitionist sentimentalities was Hinton Rowan Helper. The anti-slavery movement in North Carolina has often been generalized by well-known but still racist, anti-slavery proponents who felt that all blacks were inferior to whites. The anti-slavery movement in North Carolina began with the gradual emancipationists during the 1780s-1820s which was then supplanted by the American Colonization Society and North Carolina Manumission Society during the 1820s and 1830s. No single group was dominant in the state after that period.
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Record #:
21400
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1629 and 1640, English and French Huguenot refugees in England planned and endeavored to colonize Carolana, which consists of modern-day North Carolina and South Carolina. The English and French groups cooperated as well as competed with each other during the entire effort. The groups tried settling the area for profit from New World goods and for religious freedom as Huguenots. The colonization attempt failed as bad timing, insufficient funds, and poor management doomed the expeditions.
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