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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 29 Issue 2, April 1952
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Record #:
20440
Abstract:
Morality does not always dictate a politician's campaign and the same is true in the early political history of the state. During the first three decades of the 19th century a pervasive technique to win elections in the General Assembly and Congress developed called electioneering. Those politicians electioneering spent as much time in the public arena as possible attempting to convince voters of their aptitude over the other candidates. Though the norm today, this technique went against the election philosophy of the time which is outlined by the author.
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Record #:
20439
Abstract:
Today passing a Bar Examination is a stressful endeavor, though in the state's history this was not always the case. The author tracks changing requirements for not only the bar exams but the credentials needed to become a lawyer. Specifically, she looks at the years 1820 to 1860 when the system became more formalized; though qualifications such as \"moral character\" were considered the most pressing prerequisite.
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Record #:
20442
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Fort Hatteras was captured by a joint expedition between Union Major General Butler and Commodore Stringham on August 31, 1861. Considered a great victory for the North and an unsettling development for the South and especially North Carolinians, the author looks at the consequences for the Confederate cause with the loss of Hatteras. The author also details the course of events leading up to the fall of Fort Hatteras.
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Record #:
20441
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Of three United States presidents from the state, James K. Polk is considered the most \"Tar Heel.\" Though he moved with his family to Tennessee when he was eleven, Polk returned to the state to attend the University of North Carolina. It is Polk's college career which the author chooses to focus on and covers both Polk's academic and extracurricular activities at the university.
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Record #:
20443
Abstract:
A continuation of articles written to President Andrew Johnson during Reconstruction by citizens of North Carolina. The letters covered were written are from October 1867.
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