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4 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 15 Issue 1, Jan 1938
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Record #:
19744
Abstract:
The Food Administration was an organization during World War I in charge of rationing and distributing food to the domestic population enacted by the Food Control Act of 1917. Henry A. Page was appointed by the General Assembly to be the Federal Food Administrator for the state. Papers and correspondence from Page and his assistants are housed in the National Archives under the umbrella collection of the Unite States Food Administration and the author describes the nature of these records.
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Record #:
19742
Abstract:
George Edmund Badger became a US Senator in 1846 when he was elected to fill William Henry Haywood Jr.'s open seat. The article contains a brief biographical sketch about Badger and his continued education and early endeavors in public service. Focus is largely on his Senate years between 1846 and 1849. Badger made several important speeches in the Senate concerning the Mexican American War and slavery in the territories and which are analyzed in this article.
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Record #:
19743
Abstract:
The term \"free Negro\" for the purposes of this article refers to \"all free mulattoes, descended from Negro ancestors to the fourth generation inclusive, though one ancestor of each generation may have been a white person\" in the state before 1861. The author describes the state's population of free African Americans before the Civil War attempting to understand occupations, geographical concentrations across the state, and to quantify this group.
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Record #:
19745
Abstract:
Part of Martin Van Buren's records at the Library of Congress includes 61 volumes of various correspondence and personal papers. Within these are letters between Van Buren and several of the state's Democrats of the period. The relevant letters are reprinted here to demonstrate North Carolinian's opinions on national issues of the period.
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