NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 54 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2007
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
9427
Author(s):
Abstract:
Princeville, founded in 1865, is the oldest town in the United States incorporated by African Americans. The flooding that followed Hurricane Floyd in 1999 destroyed the town. The was not the first time the town had experienced flooding, but it was the first time that national attention was turned on this small, rural community. Princeville was acknowledged as a place of great historical culture and significance. Refusing a FEMA buyout of their damaged or destroyed homes, the citizens chose to remain and rebuild their community.
Record #:
9428
Abstract:
Benson in Johnston County is an example of a small agricultural community that once depended on the mule for farming and mule-trading business for economic sustenance. Those days have long since passed, but each September for the past fifty-eight years, Benson has celebrated its mule history with a festival called Mule Days. The festival attracts between 50,000 to 70,000 people from all over the country.
Subject(s):
Record #:
9426
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shag dancing originated over sixty years ago in the Carolinas and has become a permanent part of Southern culture. In the early days only a small number of people had the desire to learn the intricate steps of the dance. Today, there are over one hundred shag clubs, located primarily in the Carolinas, and shag books, periodicals, radio stations, and websites. Brown traces the history of this style of dancing.
Subject(s):
Record #:
36505
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lake Eden Arts Festival (LEAF)’s philosophy is creating community through music and arts, and while they host various folk performances during their festival, the food is not to be ignored either. Chefs from as far away as Africa and as close at the local market gather to showcase the foods that are symbolic to them or their community.
Record #:
36508
Abstract:
Ramps, a type of onion that smells and tastes like a cross between leeks and garlic, were and are used for a variety of purposes. Regional to Appalachian areas, they can be eaten raw or cooked, and were often the centerpiece of many funny stories about eating or harvesting too many of them.