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7 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 52 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2005
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Record #:
8385
Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society has awarded Eugenia Cecelia Conway a 2005 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for her forty-five years of work “exploring and promoting the special excellences of folk musicians, important regional traditions, and the African American influences on the development of Southern and mountain banjo traditions.” She has produced a body of scholarly works, audio recordings, videos, and films that preserve and document notable performances and interviews with important traditional artists.
Record #:
8388
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Capital City Five formed in 1944. Two of the founding members are still with the group, and there has been very little turnover in the sixty-two years they have sung together. The “newest” singing member joined in 1966. Musically, they are firmly rooted in tradition, drawing from old hymns and spirituals, early recordings, and songs learned at home during childhood. The group maintains a busy schedule, performing across North Carolina and from Atlanta to Boston. The Capital City Five received a 2005 Brown-Hudson Award for “their musical excellence, artistic integrity, traditional base, dedication to faith, activity as performers, community involvement, and longevity as a group.”
Record #:
8390
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award is given to organizations and individuals that make valuable contributions to the state's folklife. The first award was given in 1992. The Terry family received the 2005 Community Traditions Award for contributions they have made to the heritage and music of the state over the past one hundred years. The family's origin in the Little River Valley date back earlier than 1750. The family comprises the heart of the Doc Branch Band, and they are well-grounded in old-time fiddle and country tunes they learned from their father's generation.
Record #:
8386
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although born in New York City, Paul Brown developed his love of traditional Southern music from exposure to it by his mother, who was from an old Virginia family. He taught himself to play the banjo and received a National Endowment of the Arts grant to study banjo with one of North Carolina's great banjo players. In 1980, he moved to Mt. Airy permanently. He worked on the local radio station and at NPR in Washington, D.C. Both places gave him a platform from which to share his love of traditional music and the people who perform it. Brown received a 2005 Brown-Hudson Award for a lifetime of devotion to the people who create and keep alive Southern string-band music.
Record #:
36432
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the founding of Raleigh, farmers have been bringing their products to market in the city; in the 1950s, the local government set up a larger facility for the City Market, which then grew to a larger facility in the 1990s. Interest in farmers markets has waxed and waned over the years, but the marketplace rituals share features from around the world.
Record #:
36437
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author traveled to all 100 counties in North Carolina to seek out local cooks and their recipes and stories. A sampler of this collection is reproduced in this article.
Record #:
36439
Author(s):
Abstract:
After finding a journal that belonged to his grandmother from 1951-52, the author was able to devise what daily life was like for an African American woman.