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12 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 48 Issue 1-2, 2001
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Record #:
37053
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The Bethune Pottery is a collection of statues waiting to be purchased as lawn art. The figures range from giant mushrooms and whimsical alligators to classical Greek and Renaissance knockoffs.
Record #:
36332
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Reviewing the past nominations for the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award, the author spent time with some of the nominations, Jennings Chestnut and the Faulks. Chestnut is the owner of Chestnut Mandolin, a handmade string instrument store. Guy and Tina Faulk are folk musicians and the owners of Guy and Tina’s Bluegrass Pickin’ Parlor, a hub for local bluegrass music.
Record #:
36329
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Within the McKinley family, everyone had a purpose; fishermen and hunters provided and were basket weavers for fish traps, someone learned to play music, and other person acted as the family doctor for minor injuries. Basket making had been passed down through the family for generations but with changing time and practices, the art of basket weaving is being lost.
Record #:
36331
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Continuing tradition from West African roots, prayer meeting life experiences come through songs and testimonies. The church goers praise the Lord through chanting, body expressions, and shouting. Stories are told of everyday experiences but told through the power of God.
Record #:
36333
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A song about a frog riding on the back of a raccoon to various places was well known in some areas of South Carolina. The author learned the song as a small child, but did not know the history and variations of the song until much later. When she was in college, she collected several variations of the song, which all followed the same general story line.
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Record #:
36334
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Usually an accompaniment to barbecue, hash, a food mostly native to South Carolina, is basically a stew made with meat and vegetables, but the base broth varies widely dependent on the individual. The best agreed upon time to make hash, however, is by the light of a full moon.
Record #:
36330
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Growing up in a mill town, the mill provided lots of spare parts to make everyday items out of. Gear wheel wagons were a particular favorite, but other toys included yarn balls, rubber guns, and jump ropes.
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Record #:
36328
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South Carolina face vessels are wheel thrown jugs with human features applied by hand. Originating from enslaved Africans, the tradition grew to be produced by European-American potters.
Record #:
36339
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Although many mexican restaurant cater to a non-mexican customer base. El Perico serves almost only Mexicans. Taco stands in Mexico vary their foods widely by region, but El Perico has a small menu of dishes that sidestep regional food differences and invoke a pan-Mexican offering. Traducido al español de las páginas 102-109.
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Record #:
36337
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Food is an integral part of the traditions in many people’s lives, including the author’s. At every holiday, celebration, event, a traditional or corresponding food was always prepared for the occasion.
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Record #:
36347
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The author explains how the travel and tourism industry and various state arts and cultural agencies collaboratively preserve and document South Carolina’s traditions cultural properties through cultural tourism.
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