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14 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 35 Issue 2, Summer-Fall 1988
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Record #:
16266
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The Badgett Sisters of Caswell County have preserved an important part of the State's cultural heritage. They sing gospel music in the jubilee style as they learned it from their father. They sing for family and friends, church members, festivals and concerts, schools, and even prisons.
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16267
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Eva Wolfe, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, is one of the most widely known creative basketmakers in the United States.
Record #:
16294
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After coming to North Carolina in 1924 as a graduate student in sociology, Guy Benton Johnson intended to study social sciences, but under the advisement of Howard Odum, Johnson spent his first year in graduate school compiling and editing manuscripts of black folk song. The result was THE NEGRO AND HIS SONGS in 1925 and later THE NEGRO WORKADAY SONGS and JOHN HENRY: TRACKING DOWN THE NEGRO LEGEND.
Record #:
16298
Abstract:
The settlements were few and far between in the southern foothills area of the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina. In the early part of the 20th-century, life was hard and the people were poor. In order to cope with hard times, the people helped each other; one way in which they helped was the annual event called corn shucking. Corn shucking brought people together by combining the work of shucking corn with a social gathering.
Record #:
16297
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Oxen, are not generally associated with Southern agriculture. Mules hold that distinction and round out the popular stereotype of the Southern farm, along with cotton, poverty, and tenancy. These stereotypes, popularized since the Civil War in both fiction and scholarly studies, neglect the important role oxen played in the South well into the late 19th-century.
Record #:
16296
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Over the past two decades Tom Davenport has established himself as one of the most important and successful folklore filmmakers active in America. His finest films are all essentially autobiographies of people and cultures whose stories they tell. This uniquely autobiographical approach is apparent in his North Carolina films.
Record #:
16295
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Once upon a time, the NORTH CAROLINA FOLKLORE JOURNAL was published by a coterie of editors at North Carolina State University. Leonidas Betts manned the editorship with a special touch developed through an intimate knowledge of North Carolina rural life learned as a boy and deepened by his folklore scholarship.
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Record #:
35886
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Shaw was a traditional fiddler and folk musician who promoted gatherings to listen and play music.
Record #:
35892
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The Society for Creative Anachronisms recreates various aspects of medieval life in modern times. Several popular anecdotes are associated with this group, such as ‘the mugger vs. the chainmail shirt.”
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Record #:
35891
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Diving into her own genealogy, the author compares family tales to the archival records from the Civil War to decipher truth from tale.
Record #:
35887
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Thomas Burt participated in the full scope of blues history in North Carolina, from childhood to playing in blues festivals.
Record #:
35889
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Ernest East was a traditional fiddler and string band leader who kept alive old-time music.
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Record #:
35888
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Teaching her children how to harmonize and encouraging their musical gifts, Landis contributed to musical life in churches, the black community, and the state of North Carolina.
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Record #:
35890
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A brief overview of Doc and Merle, a documentary film about the musical duo Doc Martin and Merle Watson.
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