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8 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 21 Issue 3, Sept 1973
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Record #:
16389
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditional folksong, quite apart from its intrinsic artistic worth, serves as an important mirror of culture as well, providing both an oral history of local traditions, and supplying social and psychological indicators. Joyner analyzes the repertory of Nancy Jones of Scotland County, North Carolina in an attempt to illuminate the role of the folksinger in sustaining tradition, the role of tradition in shaping the culture in which the individual lives, and on the interrelations between the three.
Record #:
16390
Author(s):
Abstract:
In plantation times, Christmas was a time of relative freedom for slaves. The plantation journals and travel accounts often not only record this, but give elaborate descriptions of how the slaves celebrated. In many places in the circum-Caribbean area, including the Old South, the most dramatic feature of the Christmas celebration lay in the wandering groups of costumed players who went from one plantation to another.
Record #:
16395
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cherokee myth proffers its own justifications for the peculiarities of individual animal species. The Cherokee myths are closely akin to other \"just-so\" stories in that the animals individual peculiarities result from a mutation of the animal from an existing condition to a condition which is altered. The Cherokee myths deviate in that the animals in the Cherokee myths are not the same animals that exist on earth today, the mythic animals of the Cherokee being larger and more neatly perfect than their contemporaries, and being organized socially and politically like the Cherokee nation.
Record #:
35616
Author(s):
Abstract:
By using “The Wife of Bath,” a story within Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, the author takes an in-depth look at how perceptions in society may have changed the meaning of the proverbs used in the story between the 14th century and the present.
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Record #:
35618
Abstract:
Ray Lum started trading horses and mules when he was a teenager, and continued to do so even after most farming techniques turned to mechanical devices. Transcribed from an interview with Mr. Lum, the author included a glossary for the vernacular terms.
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Record #:
35619
Author(s):
Abstract:
Created in the mid-1820s, an anthology of songs, passed down the family line until Mr. Abrams bought it in 1937, was the start of a quest to find the song tunes by Mr. Abrams.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35615
Abstract:
While traveling in Transylvania, Romania, the author took note of the various epitaphs and pictures that were present on tombstones.
Record #:
35617
Author(s):
Abstract:
A poem about the narrator standing in a cemetery and calling attention to his ancestors, who fought for America.
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