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10 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 13 Issue 1-2, 1965
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Record #:
16487
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Abstract:
The magical transference of disease is one of the most engaging subjects in the whole fields of folk medicine. Whether found among primitive peoples in remote parts of the world or in 20th-century America, the practice of ridding a person of a disease by transferring the malady to another person, animal, plant, or other various objects rests on sympathetic magic.
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Record #:
16489
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Among the short-lived but delightful antebellum newspapers with a marked penchant for humor was the RASP, published in Raleigh during 1841 and 1842. Although a small paper, it had a wide circulation with numerous readers.
Record #:
16486
Abstract:
Kennedy explores the collections of North Carolina ballads and folksongs from the Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore to scholarly books, journals, and anthologies.
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Record #:
16488
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Patterson discusses the melodic resources of secular folk tradition and American folk-spiritual movement born of the Shakers in North America.
Record #:
16490
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It has long been noted that Tar Heel authors make use of the rich folk materials of the State in the literature produced. Owen discusses the use of folklore in historic and contemporary North Carolina literature and its importance.
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Record #:
35256
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The author uses The Two Angry Women of Abington as a case study for his thesis that use of proverbs greatly increased in the 16th and early 17th centuries. This play has an abundant amount of proverbial lore, and is unique in the way that the playwright did not draw much from written sources for them.
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Record #:
35258
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The author seeks to call attention to the imbalance in the understanding of relations between English-Scottish ballads and Scandinavian folkeviser, and the relation those two have to the French romancero traditionnel or chanson populaire. This imbalance came about from romantic nationalism in the 19th century and the author references works done by Grundtvig and Child.
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Record #:
35254
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In this chapter, the author surmises the ways to categorize the types of folklore commonly found in Pacific areas by using either Type-Index or Motif-Index systems. To do this, tales from each region, such as Japan, China, and Southeast Asia, must be collected and analyzed for parallels between them.
Record #:
35255
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Abstract:
King Alfonso X of Spain made many contributions to his kingdom, including law, astrology, science, medicine, and music in the 13th century. He also contributed to folkloric studies, which was evident in his literary work the Canticles of Holy Mary, which acted as a collection of folk miracles.
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Record #:
35257
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Abstract:
This is a short list of proverbs arranged alphabetically by its subject matter word.
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