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11 results for NC Insight Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984
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Record #:
28945
Abstract:
Two-thirds of North Carolina’s funding for mental health, mental retardation, and substance abuse service goes to maintain state institutions. Reform schools and special schools for blind and deaf children also attract high funding. Meanwhile, community-based programs receive far less money than the institutional programs, despite the state’s commitment to de-institutionalization.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p38-54, il, por, f
Record #:
28941
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article reviews how the State of North Carolina distributes its revenues to its counties and municipalities. The methods and funding formulas incorporate philosophy and politics, calculations and common sense. State officials distribute appropriations in three general ways: per-capita spending, an equalization approach, or some combination of the two.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p13-20, il, por, f
Record #:
28939
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three government entities that provide state assistance to local governments are the North Carolina Local Government Commission, the Institute of Government, and the Local Government Advocacy Council. These entities were established for comprehensive, state-supervised oversight of local government finances, research and support for policy decisions, and formation of partnerships between state and local government.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p6-9, f
Record #:
28944
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the 1930s, North Carolina has provided foundation funding to all state systems to operate the schools. Even so, today, local appropriations account for twenty-five cents of every school dollar in North Carolina. The financial equity issue remains low on the education agenda even though it represents the cornerstone of any uniform system of free public schools.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p30-37, il, por, f
Record #:
28946
Abstract:
S. Leigh Wilson has been executive director of the North Carolina League of Municipalities since 1969. The main purpose of the league is to develop a consensus for the views of municipal officials and then advocate their viewpoints. In an interview, Wilson discusses the most pressing problems for municipalities and how they are being addressed.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p56-61, por, f
Record #:
28942
Abstract:
C. Ronald Aycock has been director of the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners since 1977. The association works on behalf of counties before the General Assembly and executive-branch offices. In an interview, Aycock discusses the most pressing needs of state counties, issues in local governance, and state funds.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p22-25, por, f
Record #:
28938
Author(s):
Abstract:
The basic services and amenities of life depend upon good leadership and execution in the local government. The North Carolina General Assembly organizes and directs how local governments deliver these basic services. This issue of Insight examines how state government in North Carolina addresses local government concerns.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p2-5, il, f
Record #:
28943
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each year, the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners surveys local government officials. This article provides a summary of the survey and selected survey results from towns across North Carolina.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p26-29, il, f
Record #:
28940
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, special districts and public authorities have substantial fiscal and administrative power, independent of any county or municipality. A chart and summary of these special districts and authorities is provided.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p10-12, il, f
Record #:
28947
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, only eight municipalities have a population over fifty-thousand. To assess the needs of the towns under fifty-thousand in population, a survey asked town managers to identify their communities’ major problems. Among their concerns were challenges in retaining jobs, attracting commercial facilities, housing rehabilitation, and insufficient new housing.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p62-65, il, f
Record #:
28948
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina local officials are at a crossroads in growth management, in financing new water and sewer projects, and in land use regulations. This article discusses how intergovernmental relationships are growing more complex, as are technical issues.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p66-74, il, f