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4 results for NC Arts Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985
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Record #:
28853
Author(s):
Abstract:
The people who settled in North Carolina brought with them their cultural values, beliefs, customs and arts. These early settlers were heterogeneous, often conflicting ethnic groups whose influence on the state’s history has been both profound and subtle.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p2-3, il
Record #:
28854
Author(s):
Abstract:
The cultural diversity of North Carolina is reflected in the traditions and artistic expressions of dancers, singers, artists and performers of every kind. It is also experienced by audiences who share in the preservation of culture by watching, listening, learning and appreciating.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p2-3, il
Record #:
28856
Abstract:
Since the English settlers first came into contact with the native people of North Carolina, there has been constant pressure on the native customs and traditions, causing many to disappear completely and others to fall into virtual disuse. To counter threats to their culture, many Indian people began to re-learn the old ways of doing things and borrowing other cultural traditions.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p6, il
Record #:
28855
Abstract:
Folk life and folk art, such as quilting and bluegrass music, are traditions that have been passed down through time. In our culturally diverse North Carolina communities, folk life continues to evolve, integrating past forms, techniques and values with the present.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, March 1985, p4-5, il