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4 results for Indy Week Vol. 29 Issue 50, Dec 2012
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18956
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Granny flats, or detached backyard dwellings also known as accessory homes or backyard cottages, were built in the last decade in Durham border Duke University's East Campus after local ordinances governing their construction were revamped. But due to the the enforcement of an invalid city code, many have been left empty and cut off from potential renters. Coleman discusses the use of the occupancy by primary owner clause, its invalidation by the North Carolina Court of Appeals in 2008, and how Durham officials were unaware until recently that they were not supposed to enforce it.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 50, Dec 2012, p11, f Periodical Website
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18957
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In a recent report from the U.S. Department of Justice, the sheriff's office of Alamance County is alleged to have participated in racial profiling of Latino drivers. Arrests in traffic stops of Latinos were used to process individuals for deportation; these findings have led to re-examination of many immigration cases from Alamance County.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 50, Dec 2012, p15 Periodical Website
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18955
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Aqua North Carolina, a subsidiary of Aqua American, one of the nation's largest private utility companies, has approached the controversial development 751 South, in Durham to provide a water source. Aqua is attempting to make a deal with Chatham County, although the water would come from Durham itself, who sells it to Chatham; Aqua would them essentially be selling the water back to Durham at a higher price.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 50, Dec 2012, p9-10, f Periodical Website
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18954
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Pay walls are becoming an increasingly common strategy for media. And beginning December 2012, visitors to the website of the Raleigh NEWS AND OBSERVER will have to pay after being able to read a limited number of articles for free.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 50, Dec 2012, p8, 15 Periodical Website
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