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9 results for Independent Weekly Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011
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Record #:
27804
Author(s):
Abstract:
The second story in the series on fracking in North Carolina (first story in May 11, 2011 issue). Private landowners are signing one-sided contracts with exploration companies searching for natural gas. Under these contracts, private citizens will earn less than citizens in other states where fracking is common. Additionally, the private landowners will be liable for the cost of cleanup in the case of environmental disasters, fines for zoning and land use violations, and other legal fees. These fees will likely cost them more than they will make from the royalties on their land.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p5, 15 Periodical Website
Record #:
27809
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the 150th anniversary of the Civil War arriving soon, the effects of the war are still felt in several ways. The way the event is being celebrated angers some, but has changed to include diverse views and be more inclusive than celebrations in the past. However, some groups still celebrate the South as they believe it was and should be through hate groups. Modern connections are also drawn between the exploitation of people and the modern exploitation of the environment. Historians and archivists share their opinions on the effects of the war, what has changed, and what hasn’t.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p22-25 Periodical Website
Record #:
27807
Author(s):
Abstract:
The end of the Civil War and its effect on Raleigh is explored. Both Confederate and Union troops took any and all livestock, goods, and material they could find during the last three weeks of the war. The Confederate troops were ordered to do this to prevent Gen. William T. Sherman’s troop from using the supplies. The physical evidence left by the war that is still visible in Raleigh and sites of major significance in Raleigh during the war are also described.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p20-21, 23 Periodical Website
Record #:
27811
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of the Red Strings or “Heroes of America” is detailed. The group fought for peace and rebelled against the Confederacy in North Carolina. The history of their involvement in the peace effort, support of the Union, and their association with deserters is detailed. The role of the Quakers in the war and the citizens of the Piedmont are also explained.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p25 Periodical Website
Record #:
27806
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of how 31-year old Pedro Guzman was jailed for twenty-months due to a government mistake is detailed. Guzman was granted protected status as a legal immigrant after initially being jailed for a mistake his mother with her routine renewal of a work permit. ICE officials did not notify Guzman of his changed status and jailed him knowing he had no knowledge. He is married to a legal citizen and would have qualified to stay in the US under NACARA, but was still jailed. Guzman and his family describe the effects the event had on their lives and their future goals.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
27810
Author(s):
Abstract:
The families who owned the most slaves in the Triangle area are listed. The Camerons were the most prominent slave owners, owning over 900 slaves. The Watsons, Dunns, Alstons, Harrises, Headens, Haywoods, Joneses, Perrys, Mordecais, Rogerses, Smiths, Manlys, and Hintons were all major slave owners in the Triangle area. Cenus data from the 1860s is also included along with a discussion of population in North Carolina in the 1860s. Total slaves owned for each family is listed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p24 Periodical Website
Record #:
27805
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the second story in a three-part series about the American eugenics movement after World War II. The series focuses on the wealthy benefactors and various supporters of eugenics. Supporters included ministers, bankers, journalists, and politicians. The way these individuals gained support for their ideas is also detailed along with the racial aspects of eugenics. Specifics on North Carolina’s eugenics movement is highlighted throughout, along with its effects.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p7-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27808
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of Raleigh and North Carolina's involvement in the Civil War is briefly described. William Person Mangum's predictions of the result of the war are explained. North Carolina just recognized the 150th anniversary of its secession.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p20 Periodical Website
Record #:
27816
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina playwright, author, and actress Monica Byrne is profiled. Byrne is the first theater artist to earn a residency at Elsewhere Collective in Greensboro. Byrne has also written three plays which have been produced over the past two years. She has published four short stories recently and is currently working on a novel. Byrne has an expanding body of work and her work often deals with the psychology, the erotic, violence, and the darkness in mankind.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 21, May 2011, p33 Periodical Website