NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Friend of Wildlife Vol. 38 Issue 3, May/June 1991
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
26476
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. John Anderson was elected president of the N.C. Wildlife Federation. In a recent interview, Anderson discussed how North Carolina is rapidly urbanizing and we’re seeing a clash of cultures between rural traditions and modern practices. He will continue to work towards protecting natural resources and ensuring the public’s right to use them.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 3, May/June 1991, p3-5, por
Record #:
26477
Author(s):
Abstract:
Last year two North Carolinians traveled from Raleigh to the Soviet Union on a scientific collection expedition. Their purpose was to find the taimen, the largest salmonid species in the world, and the lenok, a salmonid fish native to Siberian rivers. These fish will be displayed at the Tennessee Aquarium in June 1992.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 3, May/June 1991, p8-10, il
Record #:
26479
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several North Carolina environmental groups have formed an alliance to develop the Budget for a Green Assembly. The Budget is a proposal for programs and funding necessary to preserve and protect environmental quality throughout the state.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 3, May/June 1991, p13, por
Record #:
26480
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new Forest Stewardship program is being offered to forest landowners in North Carolina. Participants will help guide state agencies in developing a plan for forest conservation and wildlife management regulations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 3, May/June 1991, p14, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26478
Author(s):
Abstract:
State wildlife biologists have released five river otters in the Little Tennessee River in Swain County, bringing to 20 the total number released this past winter in the North Carolina mountains. Biologists developed the otter restoration program in hopes of returning the river otter to previous population levels.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 3, May/June 1991, p9, il