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10 results for Friend O’ Wildlife Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982
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Record #:
26935
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hunter’s Clays began in England to reproduce the kinds of shots most frequently encountered by bird shooters. Its growing popularity has spread to the United States, and hunters hope that it will become a major shooting sport in this country. Competition is strictly local and conducted among club members and hunting companions.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p6
Subject(s):
Record #:
26934
Author(s):
Abstract:
This month North Carolina fishermen observed a large bass feeding on minnows, but they noticed the bass did not have eyes. While eyesight plays an important role in feeding, bass can also sense vibrations along their lateral lines. Fishermen can use rattle-type plugs, which are lures designed to attract bass through sound as well as sight.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p5, por
Record #:
26931
Author(s):
Abstract:
The most satisfactory way to deal with mosquitos, gnats, biting flies, ticks, and mites during the North Carolina summer is to make yourself as unattractive as possible. DEET is the best insect repellent and proper clothing protects bare skin from insect bites. To treat bites, use Campho-Phenique as an itch-reliever and an antiseptic.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p3, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26933
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Frederick S. Barkalow, Jr., retired zoology and forestry professor at North Carolina State University, died on June 22, 1982 of a heart attack at the Fishing School he started at Cape Hatteras. Fred was named Conservationist of the Year in 1969 and received numerous awards for his dedicated service. He was also a true sportsman who believed hunting and fishing were important wildlife management techniques.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p5, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26936
Author(s):
Abstract:
The conventional yawn occurs when breathing slows down because of fatigue, inactivity or lack of sleep. Some animals yawn for convention, but for others, yawns are mere weapons in territorial battles. Lizards and fish open their mouths to threaten unwelcome invaders.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p6, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26937
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a long and vigorous contest between conservationists and industry, the Endangered Species Act has been reauthorized for another three years. The essential rare wildlife protection elements of the Act are intact, overly complex regulations have been trimmed, and many changes requested by industry, sportsmen and Interior have been accommodated.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p7, il
Record #:
26932
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly recently passed several bills favorable to wildlife. The bills include a supplemental appropriation of one-million dollars to fund wildlife programs, enactment of a State voluntary migratory waterfowl stamp, and changes in the fox laws.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p4
Record #:
26940
Author(s):
Abstract:
A woodlands tract, known as Camassia Slopes, harbors rare and endangered species of wildflowers along the Roanoke River in Northampton County. The North Carolina Nature Conservancy will manage the site as a wildlife sanctuary and field laboratory for education and research projects. They will also begin an inventory of the plant species and monitor wildflower populations.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p16, por
Record #:
26939
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Interior Department did not appeal when a district judge gave cattle priority on a Montana wildlife refuge to allow livestock grazing. The National Wildlife Federation and the Montana affiliate are appealing the decision because they believe grazing will be detrimental to wildlife in the refuge.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p11, il
Record #:
26938
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Brunswick County Wildlife Club hosted the North Carolina Wildlife Federation Board of Directors meeting in Shallotte. Among the subjects of high priority were the Barrier Islands Legislation, renewal of the Endangered Species Act, and the threat of environmental damage along seven miles of State Road 1568 on Topsail Island.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p8, por