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7 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , High Season 1998
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Record #:
3810
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Abstract:
A powerful storm in 1846 carved Oregon Inlet through the Outer Banks. Now 2,500 feet wide, it is a place of turbulent waters and shifting sands. It is a mixed blessing, taking lives, yet providing ocean access for fishermen. A controversial plan to control the shifting inlet is construction of two 3,500-foot jetties.
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Record #:
3813
Author(s):
Abstract:
An unlikely pairing on Hatteras Island in 1923 of an illiterate, self-taught midwife, Bathsheba Foster (\"Mis' Bashi\") and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine graduate Blanche Nettleton Epler provides a picture of maternity care and the dangers women faced in childbirth a hundred years ago.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , High Season 1998, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3812
Abstract:
Scientific teams, assembled by the N.C. Sea Grant College Program from four state universities, including East Carolina University and N.C. State, studied the effects of pfiesteria. Among the areas researched by the ECU scientists were the health of crabbers compared to that of nonfishers and whether crabbers set out pots.
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Record #:
3811
Abstract:
While pfiesteria looms large in the headlines, it is only one of a number of thousands-of-years-old, harmful algal blooms that can flourish under the right conditions. Others include red tides and brown tides. The algae can cause illness and death in humans and affect coastal businesses.
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Record #:
3814
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seabirds have bills designed for their own style of eating. Some are pointed, like that of the sanderling, which allows it to poke into the sand. The brown pelican has a long, bulky beak that allows it to seine 2.5 gallons of water for fish. Still other birds have beaks that are flat, stumpy, or slender.
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Record #:
3825
Abstract:
A section of Wrightsville Beach that had been ravaged by Hurricane Fran is 1996 is being restored through a unique approach. The town allowed a Florida grower to harvest sea oat seeds in return for grown plants. Now over 25,000 sea oat plants are helping to stabilize and trap sand on the new dunes.
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Record #:
3824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ron Dotson, a fisheries biologist, is the new director of the North Carolina Sea Grant College Program, effective July 1, 1998. He has been interim director since January, 1997. He received his Ph.D. from Texas A & M and has authored or co-authored over thirty scientific publications.
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