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6 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2005
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Record #:
7220
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Every foreign vessel and every registered U.S. vessel of more than sixty tons entering and leaving a North Carolina port is required by law to use a state-licensed pilot. Any ship master violating this law is guilty of a Class I misdemeanor. Green discusses the history of pilots in North Carolina waters, pilot training, and current 'homeland security' duties.
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Record #:
7339
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Atlantic white cedar reaches a height of fifty feet at maturity. The fragrant, lightweight, rot-resistant wood was highly valued by early coastal residents, who used it for shingles, siding, and boatbuilding. Unfortunately, its popularity led to overharvesting. In the 1890s, Pocosin Lakes, located in Tyrrell, Hyde, and Washington Counties experienced widespread logging that cleared over 200,000 acres of the tree. Today only about 10,600 acres of the white cedar remain in the Southeast. Loughner discusses a plan to restore 10,800 acres of the cedar's pocosin habitat in Tyrrell County and elsewhere in North Carolina. Today, approximately 2,000 acres of pocosin are restored, with around 800 acres of white cedar planted and thriving.
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Record #:
7340
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Bycatch is a hotly debated topic among fishermen involved in inshore shrimping, individuals, and state agencies. Bycatch is the amount of non-targeted catch that fishermen net along with their intended catch. Inshore shrimping nets can scoop up valuable commercial and recreational fish, such as croaker, spot, gray trout, and flounder. If large numbers of these fish end up as bycatch, their populations will decline and affect sportsfishermen and other commercial fisheries. A North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant project assesses the bycatch generated in North Carolina's southeastern shrimp fisheries.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2005, p16-19, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7342
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River otters are known for their antics, whether performing in the wild or in an aquarium. This animal can grow to around three or four feet and weigh more than forty pounds. It can live up to fifteen years in the wild and sometimes longer in captivity. However, back in the 1800s and early 1900s, the river otter had all but vanished from the North Carolina landscape. Uncontrolled trapping, water pollution, and habitat destruction contributed to its demise. In the 1970s the state began an otter reintroduction program. Today the otter has been successfully restored throughout the state.
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Record #:
7343
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Protecting seafood from bacteria harmful to humans starts as soon as the fish are landed on the boat. Green discusses a new program to prevent histamine poisoning in bluefish, tuna, and other scombroid species. According to state officials, there was just one case of histamine poisoning in North Carolina in 2004 and that was in Dare County. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta reported 297 cases between 1993 and 1997.
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Record #:
7341
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In the summer of 2005, Jerry Schill will end eighteen years as president of the North Carolina Fisheries Association. The trade organization has represented North Carolina's commercial fishing interests since 1952. Schill reflects on the status of commercial fishing in North Carolina. He and his wife are retiring to a 100-acre dairy farm in Pennsylvania.
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