NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


44 results for Carolina Trees & Branches Vol. 26 Issue No. 3, July 2017
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
38990
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stephen Decatur Pool, a native of Elizabeth City, NC, was an educator and a newspaper editor. He and his wife operated the Elizabeth City Academy and he became the editor of ‘The Old North State’ in 1850. Pool eventually moved to Carteret County, was a Colonel in the Civil War, and represented Carteret County in the Legislature. After the war, he moved to New Bern, NC, was editor of the ‘New Bern Daily Journal of Commerce,’ and was elected NC Superintendent of Public Instruction in 1874. Being forced to leave this position in 1876, he moved to New Orleans and then settled in Tangipahoa Parish, MS.
Record #:
38988
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author compares the laws mandated on free men by the 1669 Constitution of Carolina, the revisions of 1682, the changes of the North Carolina Constitution of 1776 and the 1790 Federal Census.
Record #:
38989
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author of this article gives a large history of the family since 1687 in Princess Anne County, VA and later in Currituck County, NC.
Record #:
38993
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chowanoac Indians, whose lands encompassed most of modern day Gates, Hertford, Bertie and Chowan Counties, is believed by historians to be the oldest Native American tribe in North Carolina. The Chowanoac Indians suffered greatly from European diseases, and after Bacon’s Rebellion were moved to a reservation in modern day Gates County. They intermarried with the white and African-American neighbors, being no longer considered ‘Native Americans,’ but as ‘free people of color.’ In 2013, the North Carolina General Assembly enacted House Bill 549, giving the Chowanoac Indian Nation their rights as a recognized Indian tribe.
Record #:
38992
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Norcom , a native of Chowan County, studied medicine in Philadelphia and was one of the earliest clinical investigators of diseases in northeast North Carolina. He was an Army surgeon in the War of 1812, did charitable work, and wrote extensively on medical subjects. Norcum accumulated a nice fortune, but left a small estate at his death. Much of his wealth was spent educating his nine children, philanthropic causes, and paying off the debts of others to whom he had stood as surety.
Record #:
38995
Author(s):
Abstract:
Menatonon, King of the Chowanoac Indians, was described as being infirm when Gov. Ralph Lane explored the Chowan River region in 1586. He and his son, Skiko, were held as hostages as Lane and his mem explored the region. Menatonon told Lane of many things and knew the English were looking for gold and pearls. He told them about a mine called ’Chaunis Temoatan’ that had a red mineral called ‘wassador.’ A journey up the Roanoke River was aborted leaving the mineral (believed to be copper) a mystery.
Record #:
38999
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Ehringhaus, born in Elizabeth City, NC, studied law at UNC Chapel Hill and was admitted to the bar and opened a law office in Elizabeth City, NC in 1903. In 1905, Ehringhaus served in the NC House of Representatives representing Pasquotank County. He co-authored the bill creating East Carolina Teacher’s Training School and supported legislation creating a high school system in NC. In 1910, Ehringhaus, was elected solicitor for the First Judicial District and in 1932 was elected Governor of North Carolina.
Record #:
38997
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Jones, a native of Gloucestershire, England, became clerk of Chowan County Court in 1758. He represented Chowan County in the NC Assemblies and all five sessions of the Provincial Congress between 1774 and 1776. He served on the Provincial Council in 1775-76, helped produce the ‘Halifax Resolves,’ and was on the committee to write a Declaration of rights and a constitution. Jones is credited with at least one third of the ordinances passed by Congress in December 1776.
Record #:
38996
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Pory, a native of England, was educated at Cambridge College and was a newsletter writer. Pory worked with Richard Hakluyt in the preparation of ‘The Voyages…of the English Nation’ and published his own ‘Geographical Historie of Africa’ in 1600. He served in the British Parliament from 1605-1611, was secretary of the Virginia Colony from 1619-1621 and served as speaker of the first American legislature. Pory explored the Chowan River area of North Carolina in 1622 and wrote glowing of it.
Record #:
38991
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Maule, a native of Scotland, came to Virginia about 1709 and became surveyor’s apprentice to John Lawson, the Surveyor General of North Carolina. In 1714, Maule became the Surveyor General of North Carolina. He became a planter, accumulated more than 16,000 acres in Chowan Precinct (later Bertie), dealt in naval stores and slaves and operated a ferry in Chowan Precinct. He later got into politics, serving as a Bertie Precinct Justice of the Peace, served on the NC Council and was a judge of the Admiralty Court 1724-1725.
Record #:
38998
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Hinton, a Gates County native, received a land grant in 1739 for land in Craven County (later Johnston County and then Wake County). Hinton built his home called ‘Square Brick House’ on the Neuse River, six miles from present day Raleigh, NC and became one of the largest planters in his section. He served as a justice in Johnston County, served in the Provincial Assemblies and was an officer in the State militia.
Subject(s):
Record #:
38994
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nathaniel Allen, a resident of Edenton, NC, served in NC politics, and was Councilor of State in 1795. He and partners bought more than 50,000 acres around Lake Phelps and Tyrrell County, had a canal built and developed the rice and timber business.
Record #:
39003
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Elliott , born in Hertford, NC, was educated at UNC-Chapel Hill and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was part of the Engineer Corps in WWI and after the War was appointed by President Woodrow Wilson to the District of Columbia Commission, in charge of waterworks, sewers, street lighting and design and construction of municipal structures in Washington, DC. He was an engineer on numerous military campaigns to Mexico, Philippines, Liberia, Italy and rose to the rank of Colonel. He retired in 1949 to a farm in Currituck County where he wrote about local history.
Record #:
39004
Author(s):
Abstract:
After the defeat of Confederate troops at Hatteras Island and the fall of Roanoke Island in February 1862, Gen. Burnside set his sights on invading water towns in North Carolina. Confederates built breastworks at Cobb’s Point near Elizabeth City. Many citizens set fire to their homes and retreated to the country. When Federal gunboats were spotted getting ready to come into the bay, Confederates began burning the city. Approximately two blocks of the city burned before Union troops arrived and were able to save the rest of the city.
Record #:
39002
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fredrick Fitzgerald, a native of London, was ordained a priest in the Episcopal Church at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Edenton, NC. He served churches in the Northampton County area, Goldsboro, and Kinston. In 1859, he was awarded an honorary Master of Arts degree by Trinity College, Hartford, CT in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the growth of the Episcopal Church in North Carolina. Fitzgerald was a chaplain during the Civil War and held the rank of Major.