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16 results for Carolina Trees & Branches Vol. 26 Issue No. 1, January 2017
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Record #:
38954
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The author discusses how our early ancestors came by ship. They would later travel in 1755 by horseback, wagon or walking down the King’s Highway from Boston to Charleston, SC through eastern North Carolina. There was ‘The Fall Line Road’ through central North Carolina and The Upper Road’ in the 1740’s from Fredericksburg, VA to Macon, GA through the western Piedmont of North Carolina. The Great Valley Road started in Philadelphia and crossed the Piedmont of North Carolina ending in Augusta, GA. or go west out of Roanoke, VA to Knoxville, TN.
Record #:
38950
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This article deals with an 1840 Hardeman County, TN deed mentioning Morgan Cartwright formerly of Camden County, NC, but now of Hardeman County, TN.
Record #:
38953
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The author continues the genealogy of the Jennings family. This article deals with the eight children of William Jennings and his wife Patsy. of Pasquotank County.
Record #:
38952
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This article deals with a 1788 deed concerning John Abbott of Camden County’s share of the estate of Timothy Hixon, dec’d.
Record #:
38951
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This article is a long list of the church roll of Wesley Chapel, Tyrrell Co., NC.
Record #:
38955
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Manteo first appears in the records, along with an Indian named Wanchese, who both agreed to be taken to England about 1584. Thomas Harriot taught the Indians to speak English and the Indians described what they knew or their native region. Manteo sailed back to North Carolina with Sir Richard Grenville and Ralph Lane in 1585 and acted as interpreter. When Lane killed the Indian Chief at Roanoke Island in 1586 and quickly left for England, Manteo went back with him. Sir Walter Raleigh named Manteo ‘Lord of Roanoak” in 1587 and the colonists were placed under his protection. Manteo returned to Roanoke Island in 1587 and went with Edward Stafford to the Indian village Croatan, where he saved the Englishmen from attack. The colonists were supposed to make their way to the Chesapeake Bay, leaving a party on Roanoke Island to wait for the arrival of John White with supplies. A majority of colonists arrived at the Chesapeake Bay safely, but the ones that remained disappeared and were believed had gone with Manteo at Croatan.
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Record #:
38956
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Wilson Gray Lamb, Jr., a native of Elizabeth City, NC, rose to the rank of Third Lieutenant in the Civil War and distinguished himself during the evacuation of Wilmington, the Battle of Kinston and the Battle of Bentonville. He concealed the battle flag of the Seventeenth Regiment and smuggled it past Union forces until he got it to his home in Williamston, NC. He donated the flag to the NC Hall of History about 1915. After the war, Lamb was the chief manufacturer’s representative in North Carolina for Daniel Miller and Company of Baltimore, MD. Lamb was also a charter member and the first president of the revived North Carolina Society of the Cincinnati.
Record #:
38960
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Samuel Swann, born in Perquimans Precinct, was educated in law and surveying and in 1728 was appointed to a commission that located the boundary line between North Carolina and Virginia. He served in the lower house of the NC Assembly for 37 years, representing Perquimans Precinct from 1725-1739, and then representing the new formed Onslow County until 1762. Swann served as Speaker of the House and his book on the revision of NC Laws known as ‘Swann’s Revisal’ was published in 1752, which became the first book published in NC. The town of Swansboro in Onslow County was named in his honor.
Record #:
38957
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Henry Abbot(t), a native of England, appeared in Camden County as a schoolmaster and later became an early Baptist Church leader in northeastern North Carolina. He was a traveling evangelist from 1758 to 1764 from the Perquimans River to the Tar River. He got into NC politics and was one of the men chosen to represent Pasquotank County in the Provincial Congress at Halifax, NC in 1776. He was on the committee to draft a constitution and bill of rights for North Carolina and is recognized as the author of the nineteenth article of the NC State Constitution.
Record #:
38958
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The author of this article gives an overview of the size and fauna of the Great Dismal Swamp. She talks about the early Indians and the colonies of ‘maroons’ runaway slaves, who called the Great Dismal Swamp home. The Great Dismal Swamp and the maroons have been immortalized in literature by such writers as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Wadsworth, Moses Grandy and Frederick L. Omstead, among others.
Record #:
38962
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William Skinner, a native of Perquimans County, represented Perquimans County in the General Assembly and at the Constitutional Convention in 1788. He was treasurer of the Northern District from 1777-1779, treasurer for Edenton District from 1777-1784, and as Judge of the Admiralty Court until 1789. Skinner served as Brigadier General of the NC Militia for Edenton District from 1777-1779. He served as Perquimans County Clerk of Court and Sheriff and was named as a Town Commissioner of Hertford, NC.
Record #:
38963
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James Craven, a native of England, appears in North Carolina in 1734 as Pasquotank Precinct Clerk of Court and then as Chowan County Clerk of Court in 1740. In 1751 he was appointed to serve as Secretary of NC Royal Council and in 1753 presented his commission as councilor. Craven was also a merchant.
Record #:
38961
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Francis Godfrey, lived in Perquimans Precinct, where he was a merchant and innkeeper. He was a member of the Albemarle Council by 1669 and served as the Proprietor’s Deputy for Sir Peter Colleton.
Record #:
38965
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John Skinner, a native of Perquimans County, served on the NC Continental Line in the Revolution and was active in NC politics. He represented Perquimans County in the legislature and in 1790 was named as the first federal marshal for the District of North Carolina. Skinner was involved in several ventures including a fishery, tobacco, a mill and a bake house at the mouth of the Perquimans River. Skinner owned ‘Ashland,’ on the Perquimans River, described as one of the finest houses in northeastern North Carolina. He moved to Chowan County after 1797 where he built an estate known as ‘Montpelier.’
Record #:
38964
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Abstract:
Harry Skinner, a native of Perquimans County, was a lawyer in Greenville, NC and was an advocate of farmers and education. He authored numerous articles on the economic plight of farmers. Skinner represented Pitt County in the legislature, fought for the establishment of Industrial Training School for girls at Greensboro, NC, financial relief for farmers and the creation of a railroad Commission. He was appointed US District Attorney for the Eastern District of NC in 1901 and served as president of the North Carolina Bar Association from 1915-1916.