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10 results for Carolina Trees & Branches Vol. 22 Issue No. 2, April 2013
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Record #:
38826
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Abstract:
John Skinner, a native of Perquimans Co., NC, served on the NC Continental Line in the Revolution, and served in the NC Senate and House of Commons from Perquimans County. Between 1779 to 1785, Skinner received land grants for 1,399 acres of land. He had 850 acres planted in tobacco, owned a fishery, mill, bakery and 28 slaves. He served on the Governor’s Council from 1788 to 1789 and served on the NC Convention to vote for the ratification of the Constitution. Skinner was appointed one of the first thirteen Marshals by President George Washington in 1790, serving four years. In 1794, he was named as Commissioner of Loans for North Carolina. When he died at his home in Perquimans Co., NC in 1819, Skinner had only 50 silver dollars and his estate was $2,000 in debt.
Record #:
38822
Author(s):
Abstract:
Isaac Gregory, a native of Pasquotank Co., NC, served as Pasquotank County Sheriff and represented Pasquotank County in the last Royal Colonial Assembly. He was a delegate to the Provincial Congresses in 1776 and 1777 and held various offices in the region. In 1779, Gregory was appointed a Brigadier-General of the Edenton District militia. He was wounded badly in the Revolution and in 1780 formed another militia company of dragoons. By 1781, Gregory was accused of secretly helping the British and when Court Marshal proceeding were about to begin, the British sent word that it was all fabricated. After the war, he served in the NC General Assembly , was a trustee of academies, and was a delegate to the Constitutional Conventions of 1788 and 1789. Gregory also served as Commissioner of Navigation for the Albemarle Sound and was Customs Collector for Camden Co., NC.
Record #:
38825
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Abstract:
Sarah Moore Delano Decrow, born about 1728, was married first in 1767 to Ichabod Delano and secondly in 1775 to Robert Decrow. Robert Decrow ran an ordinary with his wife and after his death in 1784, Sarah continued to run it. She was in and out of Court, being both articulate and contentious. In 1789, Sarah opened an ordinary in Hertford Co., NC and after a week was charged with selling non-tax paid liquor. In 1792, Sarah was the first postmaster of Hertford, NC and became the first female postmaster in the United States. Sarah continued as postmaster until her death in 1795.
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Record #:
38823
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The author gives a transcription of a family history found in the Dempsey Casey family bible. Dempsey Casey (1798-1864) was from Possum Quarter, Pasquotank Co., NC and later of Indiana.
Record #:
38824
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author gives a transcription of a family history found in the Dempsey Casey family bible. Dempsey Casey (1798-1864) was from Possum Quarter, Pasquotank Co., NC and later of Indiana.
Subject(s):
Record #:
38829
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Abstract:
Tamsen Donner, a native of Massachusetts, came to Elizabeth City, NC in 1824 to teach botany at the Elizabeth City Academy. In 1829, she married Tully Dozier, of Camden Co., NC. She lost her husband and children to fever and she moved to Springfield, IL to care for her brothers children. While there she continued to teach botany and in 1839 remarried to George Donner. They had several children and in 1846 they set out on the overland trail to California. The Donner party got caught up in the snow in the Sierra Mountains. Tamsen Donner would not leave her sick husband, but managed to get all of the children to safety at Sutter’s Fort, California.
Record #:
38832
Author(s):
Abstract:
Samuel Pricklove, a native of Nansemond Co., Virginia, came to Perquimans Precinct, NC by 1661, was a Quaker, and served as Register of Deeds and Clerk of Inferior Court. He became involved in the Culpepper Rebellion, was arrested and sentenced to be pilloried, having is right ear cut off and being banished from the colony. At the last minute, the deposition of Thomas Miller saved Pricklove from the sentence. The spelling of the Pricklove surname at some point changed to Pritlowe.
Record #:
38827
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Abstract:
This is taken from a transcription of an original tax list showing District One, found in the Pasquotank-Camden Public Library, Elizabeth City, NC.
Record #:
38831
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Abstract:
The author gives a map showing the 1906 division of land of Caleb Banks, an African-American, of Pasquotank Co., NC, born about 1838, died before 1900.
Record #:
38828
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author gives abstracts of Camden County Bastardy Bonds (1861-1907) found in the NC Archives.