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8 results for Carolina Planning Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980
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Record #:
5989
Abstract:
Beach development is a controversial topic. One side feels that development is inevitable, yet manageable; protecting development is paramount with his group. The other side feels beach preservation is the prime issue; they feel that actions to protect development will inevitably damage the shoreline. Dr. Orrin H. Pilkey supports this second view and discusses his views in this CAROLINA PLANNING interview.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p2-6, il, por
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Record #:
5998
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Abstract:
Coastal communities benefit through tourism and the building of vacation homes by increased tax revenues, more jobs, and marketability of marginal farmland. The negative side to this is the possible destruction of the qualities that attracted people to an area in the first place. Miller discusses the problems caused by this new development on Ocracoke Island and the tensions between islanders and newcomers.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p22-26, il, bibl
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Record #:
5997
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The appearance of off-road vehicles on the state's beaches in the late 1970s marks a dramatic change in the use of the beach environment. Hosier discusses their impact on barrier islands and makes recommendations for their use, including prohibiting their use on coastal dunes. He includes off-road ordinances from communities including Holden Beach and Nags Head.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p34-40, il, bibl
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Record #:
5996
Abstract:
Zucchino discusses the structure of maritime forests. Among the functions of these trees are conserving groundwater by reducing evaporation and providing hurricane protection to barrier islands. The author discusses how early fishing villages were built in relation to the forests, the less sensitive approach to development that began after World War II, and how development in West Pine Knoll Shores dealt with maritime forests.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p14-21, il, bibl
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Record #:
15825
Abstract:
During the last twenty years, the importance of ensuring proper land planning and landscape management on barrier islands has been firmly established. Culminating with the passage and implementation of the North Carolina Coastal Area Management Act of 1974, the overall planning and management process for barrier islands has substantially improved the balance between island development activities and the ability of the barrier island to maintain its essential ecological and geomorphological functions and processes. This includes the considerable role of maritime forests in the overall maintenance of the barrier island ecosystem.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p14-21, il, f
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Record #:
15824
Abstract:
The North Carolina Nature Conservancy first opened its doors in Chapel Hill in 1977. Today it has grown to over 2,000 members statewide. The Conservancy is a publicly-supported, non-profit, scientific and education organization. Since its inception, the Conservancy has successfully preserved eight of the ten most ecologically significant areas in North Carolina.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p7-9, f
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Record #:
15826
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Abstract:
A recent Sea Grant publication by Jim Sabella and Marcus Hepburn helps agencies regulating the State's fisheries to know something about the people and communities they are regulating--their values, their history, and their culture, which includes areas like Harkers Island with rich old fishing and boat-building traditions.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p41-43, f
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Record #:
15827
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Abstract:
One of the most controversial natural resource management issues in North Carolina has been the debate surrounding the future of the Currituck Outer Banks. As one of the last remaining undeveloped and privately owned barrier island stretches on the East Coast, this debate, between environmentalists, developers, planners, and governments, has taken on national significance.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p44-52, map, f
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