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5 results for Carolina Planning Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 1984
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Record #:
15883
Abstract:
The use of solar energy for water and space heating is rapidly increasing in North Carolina. Increasing the development and use of solar energy systems requires legal assurance of adequate sunlight. North Carolina law does not recognize rights to direct sunlight when light is blocked by vegetation or structures on others' property. As a result, potential solar users cannot be guaranteed their systems will continue to function efficiently or prove a viable, long-term investment. This article offers remedies to the problem including new legislation.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 1984, p10-14, f
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Record #:
15885
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The link between education and economic growth has been understood for nearly as long as public schooling, but the concept is becoming increasingly important. International competition and technological advances have accelerated the rate of chance in the U.S. economy. The result is a decline in many traditional industries and occupations. This rapid change has focused attention on the need for improving not only education but also job training to meet new skill requirements and take advantage of new economic opportunities.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 1984, p24-28, f
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Record #:
15887
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Planners and neighborhood groups are justified in exercising caution when they consider historic preservation proposals for their communities. Although historic preservation projects can be responsible for revitalizing blighted areas, they may also be responsible for the displacement of low-income residents from their homes and businesses. This article proposes a variety of legal and financial means for mitigating the adverse impacts of historic preservation.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 1984, p34-38, f
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Record #:
15884
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For the past decade, the development of a major arts complex has been underway in downtown Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The project is unique in two ways: it represents a pioneering effort to emphasize the arts in the central city revitalization process, and it illustrates the importance of cooperation in effecting redevelopment objectives.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 1984, p18-23, f
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Record #:
15886
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Mobile home site planning has proven a troublesome task for many American planners. It is a problem of particular relevance for North Carolina planners where the mobile home industry provides an ever-increasing proportion of the state's dwelling units. This article describes mobile homes as an important alternative to conventional housing.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 1984, p29-33, 40, f
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